Quest for Inclusion: Jews and Liberalism in Modern American

By Marc Dollinger | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
Irving Howe, World of Our Fathers (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1976), 393.
2
A majority of American Jews voted Democratic in every election from 1932 to 1996. In 1948, Harry Truman won 75 percent of the Jewish vote; in 1952 and 1956 Adlai Stevenson won 64 and 60 percent, respectively; in 1960 John F. Kennedy won 82 percent; in 1964 Lyndon Johnson won 90 percent; in 1968 Hubert Humphrey won 81 percent; and in 1972 George McGovern won 65 percent. Since then, American Jews have supported Jimmy Carter, Walter Mondale, Michael Dukakis, and Bill Clinton in numbers greater than any other white ethnic group. Evelyn Lewis, “The Jewish Vote” (Ph.D. dissertation, Ball State University, 1976).
3
See Beverly and Wesley Allinsmith, “Religious Affiliation and Politico-Economic Attitude,” Public Opinion Quarterly 7 (September 1948), 377–389.
4
See David Biale, Michael Galchinsky, and Susannah Heschel, eds., Insider/ Outsider: American Jews and Multi-Culturalism (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998); Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr., The Disuniting of America: Reflections on a Multi-Cultural Society (New York: W W Norton, 1998); John A. Hall and Charles Lindholm, Is America Breaking Apart? (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999); David A. Hollinger, Beyond Multiculturalism: Postethnic America (New York: Basic Books, 1995); and Nathan Glazer, We Are All Multiculturalists Now (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1997).
5
See Werner Cohn, Sources of American Jewish LiberalismA Study of the Political Alignments of American Jews (Ph.D. dissertation, New School For Social Research, 1956). In 1976, the American Jewish Historical Quarterly devoted its December issue to “Jews and American Liberalism: Studies in Political Behavior,” while that same year William Berlin offered a related dissertation, The Roots of Jewish Political Thought in America, at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. Numerous journals and magazines have featured discussions of American Jewish liberalism, including Commentary, “Liberalism and the Jews: A Symposium” (January 1980), and Lucy S. Dawidowicz and Leon J. Goldstein, “The American Jewish Liberal Tradition,” appearing in Marshall Sklare, ed., The Jew in American Society (New York: Behrman House, 1974). See also Steven M. Cohen, The Dimensions of American Jewish Liberalism (New York: American Jewish Committee, 1989); Daniel J. Elazar, The New Jewish Politics (Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, 1988); and part 3 of Henry L. Feingold, Lest Memory Cease: Finding Meaning in the American Jewish Past (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1996).
6
Moses Rischin, The Promised City: New York's Jews, 1870–1914 (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1962); Lawrence Fuchs, The Political Behavior of American Jews (New York: Free Press, 1956); Henry Feingold, “A Midrash on

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