The New Dealers' War: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War within World War II

By Thomas Fleming | Go to book overview

I
THE BIG LEAK

Blazoned in huge black letters across the front page of the December 4, 1941, issue of the Chicago Tribune was the headline: F.D.R.'S WAR PLANS! The Washington Times-Herald, the largest paper in the nation's capital, carried a similarly fevered banner. In both papers Chesly Manly, the Tribune's Washington correspondent, revealed what President Franklin D. Roosevelt had repeatedly denied: that he was planning to lead the United States into war against Germany. The source of the reporter's information was no less than a verbatim copy of Rainbow Five, the top-secret war plan drawn up at FDR's order by the joint board of the United States Army and Navy. 1

Manly's story even contained a copy of the president's letter ordering the preparation of the plan. The reporter informed the Tribune and Times-Herald readers that Rainbow Five called for the creation of a 10-million-man army, including an expeditionary force of 5 million men that would invade Europe in 1943 to de

-i-

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The New Dealers' War: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War within World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments i
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - The Big Leak i
  • 2 - The Big Leaker 25
  • 3 - From Triumph to Trauma 49
  • 4 - The Great Dichotomy 92
  • 5 - Whose War Is It Anyway? 115
  • 6 - Some Neglected Chickens Come Home to Roost 135
  • 7 - In Search of Unconditional Purity 165
  • 8 - War War Leads to Jaw Jaw 189
  • 9 - Fall of a Prophet 214
  • 10 - What'd You Get, Black Boy? 231
  • 11 - Let My Cry Come Unto Thee 255
  • 12 - Red Star Rising 281
  • 13 - Shaking Hands with Murder 305
  • 14 - Goddamning Roosevelt and Other Pastimes 337
  • 15 - Democracy's Total War 366
  • 16 - Operation Stop Henry 390
  • 17 - Death and Transfiguration in Berlin 420
  • 18 - The Dying Champion 441
  • 19 - Lost Last Stands 473
  • 20 - A New President and an Old Policy 514
  • 21 - Ashes of Victory 548
  • Notes 563
  • Index 599
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