The New Dealers' War: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War within World War II

By Thomas Fleming | Go to book overview

2
THE BIG LEAKER

Between a war with Japan and the next step—a declaration of war against Germany, the imperative heart of Rainbow Five— there was a large and mostly inscrutable void. In the scenario Roosevelt had envisioned on the eve of Pearl Harbor, the orders to the Lanikai make it clear that the president realized he had a problem. It would be difficult to persuade the antiwar leaders in Congress and the nation that America, with its heritage of opposition to colonialism, enshrined in the American Revolution and restated often in other eras, should go to war to defend British and Dutch colonies in the East Indies and the Malay Peninsula and Singapore.

It was all too easy to envisage a raging quarrel over declaring war against Japan that even if successful would consume almost all Roosevelt's political capital. To pile on a proposal for war against Germany might trigger an unthinkable possibility: a congressional rejection that would make Adolf Hitler invulnerable. There was

-25-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The New Dealers' War: Franklin D. Roosevelt and the War within World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments i
  • Introduction xi
  • 1 - The Big Leak i
  • 2 - The Big Leaker 25
  • 3 - From Triumph to Trauma 49
  • 4 - The Great Dichotomy 92
  • 5 - Whose War Is It Anyway? 115
  • 6 - Some Neglected Chickens Come Home to Roost 135
  • 7 - In Search of Unconditional Purity 165
  • 8 - War War Leads to Jaw Jaw 189
  • 9 - Fall of a Prophet 214
  • 10 - What'd You Get, Black Boy? 231
  • 11 - Let My Cry Come Unto Thee 255
  • 12 - Red Star Rising 281
  • 13 - Shaking Hands with Murder 305
  • 14 - Goddamning Roosevelt and Other Pastimes 337
  • 15 - Democracy's Total War 366
  • 16 - Operation Stop Henry 390
  • 17 - Death and Transfiguration in Berlin 420
  • 18 - The Dying Champion 441
  • 19 - Lost Last Stands 473
  • 20 - A New President and an Old Policy 514
  • 21 - Ashes of Victory 548
  • Notes 563
  • Index 599
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.