Jazz and Pop, Youth and Middle Age like Young

By Francis Davis | Go to book overview

Leaving Behind a Trail

Meet Dave Douglas

Dave Douglas has suddenly emerged as the most talked-about (not hyped, talked about) trumpeter to emerge in jazz since Wynton Marsalis, even though almost nothing is known about him personally. The dedications in his CD booklets, to such cultural theorists as Hannah Arendt, Walter Benjamin, and Noam Chomsky, suggest a very serious fellow. A capsule bio on his debut album, Parallel Worlds (recorded in 1993, for Soul Note), tells us only that he has played with an impressive array of musicians (not all of them fellow Lower East Side experimentalists) and that he briefly attended both the Berklee School of Music and the New England Conservatory before earning his undergraduate degree through an independent studies program at NYU. But nowhere is there a clue to so much as his birthplace or exact age.

This lack of biographical information is frustrating, because hardly a month goes by anymore that he doesn't turn up on another CD destined to be counted among this decade's landmarks—Parallel Worlds and In Our Lifetime, Uri Caine's Toys, Myra Melford's The Same River, Twice, Ned Rothenberg's Power Lines, and John Zorn's Vav (the sixth in the alto saxophonist and composer's ongoing series of harmolodic horas, with the quartet he calls Masada). Not counting the cooperative New and Used, Douglas fronts four bands. These include the three-horn sextet featured on In Our Lifetime, and the string group, with violin, cello, and double bass, on Parallel Worlds and Five. There is also his Tiny Bell Trio, whose

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Jazz and Pop, Youth and Middle Age like Young
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Also by Francis Davis *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Advertisements for Myself xi
  • Part One - Voices *
  • Swin G and Sensibility 3
  • The Great Hoagy 19
  • Not Singing Too Much 27
  • Billie Holiday, Cover Artist 39
  • Betty Carter, for Example 49
  • Part Two - Change of the Century *
  • Bud's Bubble 57
  • The Sound of One Finger Snapping 66
  • Aftershocks 77
  • Taken: the True Story of an Alien Abduction - (A Conversation with Sun Ra) 83
  • Rashaan, Rashaan 94
  • Inward 99
  • A to Z 106
  • Charlie Haden, Bass 116
  • ornette 134
  • The 1970s, Religious and Circus 141
  • Like Young 156
  • In His Father's House 169
  • Leaving behind a Trail 176
  • Some Recordings 186
  • On Stage and Screen 200
  • Part Three - Here and There *
  • Tourist Point of View 219
  • Time Difference 223
  • Part Four - Undercover *
  • Man Lost. Songs Found 235
  • Country vs. Western 242
  • Elvis Presley's Double Consciousness 246
  • Beached 256
  • Everybody's Composer 263
  • The Best Years of Our Lives 281
  • Infamous 297
  • Victim Kitsch 304
  • The Moral of the Story from the Guy Who Knows 316
  • Index 339
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