Public and Private High Schools: The Impact of Communities

By James S. Coleman; Thomas Hoffer | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

This research was carried out at the National Opinion Research Center at The University of Chicago. Consistent with its distinguished tradition, NORC provided us with ample resources for the execution of our work. We are particularly indebted to Calvin Jones and the staff of the High School and Beyond project, who at several points gave us the benefit of their extensive knowledge of the data files and data collection efforts. As the sponsor and original architect of the High School and Beyond project, the Center for Statistics of the U.S. Department of Education (formerly the National Center for Education Statistics) deserves credit for the creation of one of the most important and widely used data bases available to American social researchers. We owe a special note of gratitude to Martin Kessler at Basic Books, who encouraged us to undertake a further examination of public and private schools, and who supported our decision to elaborate that examination in the directions presented here.

As the analysis for this book progressed, two different goals began to emerge. One goal was to extend our earlier work on public and private schools. The second was to study the functioning of the school as a social unit in its social context. Work on the latter set of problems, which led us to an investigation of how social capital in school and communities affects school functioning, was suported by a grant from the Spencer Foundation.

Several colleagues provided us with comments and criticisms over the course of our work on this project. Bruce Carruthers was particularly helpful in this throughout the project, and also aided us with portions of the data analysis. Participants in the Mathematical Sociology Seminar at The University of Chicago also gave us valuable feedback on a number of conceptual and technical points on two occasions when we presented portions of our research. In this capacity, we would like to thank particularly Douglas Anderton, Anthony Bryk, Yong Hak Kim, Howard Margolis, Tina Morris, and Mindy Schimmel. Our colleague at NORC, Andrew Greeley, also provided us with several useful suggestions at early stages of this project, and we are grateful for his interest and insight.

-xxi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Public and Private High Schools: The Impact of Communities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures vii
  • List of Tables x
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Prologue xxiii
  • 1 - Two Orientations to Schooling 3
  • 2 - The Design and the Clientele of Public and Private Schools 28
  • 3 - Achievement Outcomes of Schooling 57
  • 4 - Dropping out of High School 96
  • 5 - Achievement and Dropout in Disadvantaged and Deficient Families 118
  • 6 - Beyond High School: the Path Chosen 149
  • 7 - Success in College or Work 177
  • 8 - Schools, Families, and Communities 211
  • References 245
  • Index 247
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.