Public and Private High Schools: The Impact of Communities

By James S. Coleman; Thomas Hoffer | Go to book overview

7
Success in College or Work

THE questions posed in the preceding chapter concerned entry into college and did not address, except in an oblique way (tables 6.12 and 6.13), the question of success. Here we will take up the question of success for those students who entered a four-year college at some point in the four years following high school and those who had no college during this period. This excludes seniors who went to a two-year college but never attended a four-year college, and it excludes those who dropped out of high school before their senior year. For the two groups which are examined, we do not follow them in detail through the period, but ask only about certain activities. Thus, the examination of success is quite selective, but it does focus on success in college and in work.

The rate of enrollment in four-year colleges is about 20 percent greater for girls in either private sector than in the public sector, and even more for boys, rising to more than a 30 percent difference for boys from the other private sector (table 6.1). For comparable backgrounds (including cognitive skills), about 10 percent more Catholic school and other private school students enter a four-year college than do public school students (table 6.6), an increment that rises to nearly 20 percent for boys from other private schools.

-177-

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Public and Private High Schools: The Impact of Communities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • List of Figures vii
  • List of Tables x
  • Acknowledgments xxi
  • Prologue xxiii
  • 1 - Two Orientations to Schooling 3
  • 2 - The Design and the Clientele of Public and Private Schools 28
  • 3 - Achievement Outcomes of Schooling 57
  • 4 - Dropping out of High School 96
  • 5 - Achievement and Dropout in Disadvantaged and Deficient Families 118
  • 6 - Beyond High School: the Path Chosen 149
  • 7 - Success in College or Work 177
  • 8 - Schools, Families, and Communities 211
  • References 245
  • Index 247
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