Radical Sociology

By J. David Colfax; Jack L. Roach | Go to book overview

(16)
B · The Empire Abroad

Corporations and the Cold War ***

DAVID HOROWITZ

WHO makes U.S. foreign policy? The question is by no means academic, for the historical record shows that over the last fifty years and more, U.S. policy has consistently run in channels which are antagonistic to the most cherished ideals of the American Republic, issuing finally in the conflicts which we associate with the Cold War. Those ideals—enshrined in the Declaration of Independence—are democratic in character, and recognize above all the right of nations to self-determination, the freedom to carve out their own paths of historical development. Included in this freedom is the equally sacred privilege of any oppressed people to overthrow by force the institutions of their oppressors and to secure for themselves, after the example of the American revolutionaries, the rights to "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness."

Yet the record shows that as the United States has assumed the role of a great and then dominant world power, it has more and more consistently opposed the major social revolutions of our time. Moreover, in violation of the principle of self-determination, it has intervened militarily, diplomatically, and economically to crush or to cause grave

____________________
*
Reprinted by permission of Monthly Review Inc. Copyright 1969 by Monthly Review, Inc.
**
This is the introductory chapter of a collection of essays, entitled Corporations and the Cold War, published by Monthly Review Press (1969). David Horowitz, the editor of this volume, is on the editorial board of Ramparts. His most recent book is Empire and Revolution, which was reviewed in Monthly Review 7 (December 1969). —The Editors.

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