Radical Sociology

By J. David Colfax; Jack L. Roach | Go to book overview

(28)
Sociology's Children of Affluence *

WILLIAM A. GAMSON

THE American Sociological Association staged a happening in San Francisco near the end of the summer of 1967. This happening was called the 62nd Annual Meeting and for those of you who missed it, I would like to invoke something of the mood. I suppose I realized that this convention was to be a bit different when, upon arrival, a friend informed me that he had been handed a leaflet in the Haight-Ashbury advising all hippies to get their tape recorders out and go down to the Hilton Hotel where they could "observe sociologists in their natural habitat."

This intelligence was followed by a string of events in a similar vein. A local rock group called, I believe, the Second Coming, took over the main ballroom at the Hilton to stage, for the benefit of the assembled sociologists, a light show and accompanying sound barrage. This affair began with a large group of observers but first a few and then a larger number began to dance until the remaining observers were relegated to the sidelines and replaced by participant nonobservers in the middle of the floor.

The next few days found a similar irreverence in the air. The corridors had a few sandaled, loose-shirted young men with convention name tags. There seemed to me more displays of emotion and expressive behavior than usual, more laughter and more intensity in the discussions in the sessions I attended. One author of a paper submitted a poem for his abstract. In a session on sociology and public policy, one of the speakers addressed the familiar issues of a "value-free" sociology. He argued, as one might predict from the topic, for an engaged sociology but his paper was more scholarly than polemic. What interested me most was an

____________________
*
Reprinted from The American Sociologist 3, (November 1968): 286-289.

-450-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Radical Sociology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 492

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.