chapter ten
Mexicans: Social,
Educational, Economic,
and Political Problems and
Prospects in New York
Robert C. Smith

What made me realize it? Well, my family, like most of my family from the girls' side, they like—[got] pregnant, have kids, and I don't want to go through that. … Half my friends are gone … like half that group is locked up, half of that group already has two or three kids. … And I don't wanna go through that.

Juana, now a college student, made these comments in 1999 to explain how she realized she was putting her future at risk and why she stopped cutting classes and started studying in high school. The choice that Juana made

This chapter was written while the author was a Fellow at the Oral History Research Office at Columbia University, in a program supported by the Rockefeller Foundation. It also draws on research and writing done with the support of the following institutions: the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), Program in International Migration, with funds provided by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation; the National Science Foundation (NSF), Sociology Program; the Barnard College Project on Migration and Diasporas; and the Barnard College Small Grants Program. The author very gratefully acknowledges these sources of support. Excellent research on the projects funded by NSF, Barnard, and SSRC was done by three graduate students, Sandra Lara, Sara Guerrero Rippberger, and Antonio Moreno; and several undergraduates: Agustin Vecino, Griscelda Perez, Carolina Perez, Lisa Peterson, Sandra Sandoval, Linda Rodriguez, Katie Graves, Brian Lucero, and Judit Vega. Errors of fact or interpretation in this article are mine alone. I also thank Nancy Foner for inviting me to contribute to this volume, and for the help of John Mollenkopf of City University of New York and Joseph Salvo of the New York City Department of City Planning in getting some of the census and Current Population Survey (U.S. Bureau of the Census, various years a, b) figures.

-275-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
New Immigrants in New York
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Chapter One - Introduction: New Immigrants in a New New York 1
  • Notes *
  • References 26
  • Chapter Two - Immigration to New York: Policy, Population, and Patterns 33
  • Notes *
  • References 77
  • Chapter Three - Immigrants, the Native-Born, and the Changing Division of Labor in New York City 81
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter Four - Soviet Jews: the City's Newest Immigrants Transform New York Jewish Life 111
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter Five - Chinese: Divergent Destinies in Immigrant New York 141
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter Six - Koreans: an “institutionally Complete Community” in New York 173
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter Seven - Jamaicans: Balancing Race and Ethnicity 201
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Chapter Eight - West Africans: Trading Places in New York 229
  • Notes *
  • References 248
  • Chapter Nine - Dominicans: Transnational Identities and Local Politics 251
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • Internet Resources 273
  • Chapter Ten - Mexicans: Social, Educational, Economic, and Political Problems and Prospects in New York 275
  • Notes *
  • References *
  • About the Contributors 301
  • Index 305
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 313

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.