sexual preference, or religion to demand that they be allowed to participate as full and equal citizens.


NOTES
1
Kluger, Simple Justice, 389.
3
David J. Garrow, ed., The Montgomery Bus Boycott and the Women Who Started It: The Memoir of Jo Ann Gibson Robinson ( Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1987), 19-52.
4
Martin Luther King, Jr., "Letter from [a] Birmingham Jail", in Levy, Let Freedom Ring, 1.
5
Hollinger F. Barnard, ed., Outside the Magic Circle: The Autobiography of Virginia Foster Durr ( Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 1985), 274-85.
6
Septima Clark, Echo in My Soul ( New York: E. P. Dutton, 1962), 131-33. Emphasis added.
7
Quoted in Susan B. Oldendorf, "The South Carolina Sea Island Citizenship Schools, 1957-1961", in Crawford Rouse, and Woods, Women in the Civil Rights Movement, 180.
8
Ella Baker, "Bigger than a Hamburger", in Levy, Let Freedom Ring, 70-71.
9
Forman quoted in Hampton and Fayer, Voices of Freedom, 67; Howard Zinn , SNCC: The New Abolitionists ( Boston: Beacon Press, 1964).
10
Quoted in Hampton and Fayer, Voices of Freedom, 82.
11
Williams, Eyes on the Prize, 138-39.
12
Mary King, Freedom Song: A Personal Story of the 1960s Civil Rights Movement ( New York: William Morrow, 1987), 23-24.
13
Charles Payne, "Men Led, but Women Organized: Movement Participation of Women in the Mississippi Delta", in Crawford Rouse, and Woods, Women in the Civil Rights Movement.
14
All of these quotes come from Payne, I've Got the Light of Freedom, 208-218.
15
Ibid., especially chap 9.
16
Casey Hayden and Mary King, "A Kind of Memo . . . to a Number of Other Women in the Peace and Freedom Movements", reprinted in Mary King, Freedom Song.
17
Bernice Reagon, "Interview", in Levy, Let Freedom Ring, 98-99.
18
Carmichael quoted in Sara Evans, Personal Politics: The Roots of Women's Liberation in the Civil Rights Movement and the New Left ( New York: Vintage, 1980), 87. Mary King, who knew Carmichael well, understood that he made this remark in jest. Yet others who did not share King's insight and heard of the remark took it as indicative of the male-led movement.
19
Michele Wallace, "A Black Feminist's Search for Sisterhood", in Levy, Let Freedom Ring, 199-200 (originally published in the Village Voice, 1975).

-119-

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The Civil Rights Movement
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Copyright Acknowledgments v
  • Advisory Board vi
  • Contents vii
  • Series Foreword ix
  • Preface xiii
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chronology of Events xvii
  • The Civil Rights Movement Explained 1
  • 1 - The Modern Civil Rights Movement: an Overview 3
  • Notes 35
  • 2 - Freedom's Coming and It Won't Be Long: The Origins of the Civil Rights Movement 39
  • Notes 56
  • 3 - Mississippi: "Is This America?" A Case Study of the Movement 59
  • Notes 77
  • 4 - With All Deliberate Speed: The Fight for Legal Equality 79
  • Notes 100
  • 5 - Sisterhood is Powerful: Women and the Civil Rights Movement 103
  • Notes 119
  • 6 - A Second Redemption? 121
  • Biographies - The Personalities Behind the Civil Rights Movement 127
  • Primary Documents Of the Civil Rights Movement 149
  • Glossary of Selected Terms 199
  • Annotated Bibliography 205
  • Index 215
  • About the Author *
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