Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics

By Edward Teller; Judith L. Shoolery | Go to book overview

15
ACADEMICIANS
Go TO WORK
1941-1943

EARLY IN THE summer of 1941, Mici rented out our first house, moved us to New York, and reestablished us in an apartment on Morningside Drive. For about three months after the move, I dedicated every Sunday to looking for a piano. In many respects, I am a terrible husband. I have no ideas about decorating, clothes, or food, I have never entered a store or tailor shop willingly, I cannot drive a nail into a wall (straight or crooked), and I am baffled when the plumbing (or any other system or gadget) does not work. In short, I am worthless both as a fixer and as a purchaser—except in regard to a piano. There I am enthusiastically my own favorite expert.

During that summer, I played on hundreds of second-hand grand pianos and fell in love with several that were too expensive. Eventually, I found just what I wanted: a small concert grand (little more than seven feet long) with a sweet voice and excellent key action. It was at least seventy years old, and its original pillar-like round legs, which Mici would not have tolerated in her home, had been replaced with more graceful angular ones. Because it had a cracked sounding board, it was priced within our budget—$400. It remains the only possession that I truly appreciate. 1

____________________
1
That Steinway has now been with us for more than fifty years. The Monster, as Mici called it, has traveled from New York to Chicago, to Los Alamos, back to Chicago, back to Los Alamos, back to Chicago, to Berkeley, and now resides in Stanford. The sounding board problem grew quite severe in the midst of those moves; as it cracked more completely, parts of it rubbed on each other, so during our second stay in Chicago, I had it overhauled and repaired. When the sounding board was screwed down solidly, no more rubbing occurred, and the sound was lovelier than ever.

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.