Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics

By Edward Teller; Judith L. Shoolery | Go to book overview

23
TWENTY
YEARS TOO SOON
June 1949-January 1950

By THE TIME I returned to Los Alamos in the summer of 1949, the AEC had greatly improved the housing. For our proposed year-long stay, we were assigned a real house in a new subdivision that had been built west of the laboratory. The Mark, Taschek, and King families lived on the same block, and each had a daughter about Paul's age. Paul's relationship to them was not unlike mine to Lizi Grátz: Paul loved to talk, and the girls loved to listen. Our block was the farthest street up the gentle slope that led all the way to the ancient volcanic crater, so the children had a lot of space to play in and explore. Mici was very happy with our new arrangements.

The change in the laboratory that Norris Bradbury had effected during the first three and a half years he was director was impressive. In January 1946, when I had left, Los Alamos seemed close to extinction. By 1949, the laboratory had become a small, solid group of colleagues, working effectively together on simple, well-defined goals.

The first surprise I had had in the postwar period was that, when implosion bombs—the same design tested at Alamogordo and dropped at Nagasaki—were detonated on the Bikini atoll (in the Marshall Islands) in 1946, they replicated the previous yields. That our relatively crude wartime attempts had proved so reliable was impressive as well as reassuring. Many aspects of the bomb still needed modifying for safe handling and more efficient use of the expensive materials.

During the first postwar years, we also needed guidance about the nature of the bomb that the military wanted for our permanent arsenal. The designs of the first bombs reflected only our distrust of our calculations on implosion

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.