Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics

By Edward Teller; Judith L. Shoolery | Go to book overview

35
A FEW LESSONS IN
POLITICAL AFFAIRS
1955—1960

THE WELL-BEING of the Livermore laboratory was always at the forefront of my thoughts, but until 1958, it did not occupy all my time. In addition to my academic responsibilities at the university and my work at the Berkeley and Livermore laboratories—and my occasional activities in Washington—I was involved in consulting with Nelson Rockefeller.

In about 1954 or 1955, my friend Teddy Walkowicz introduced me to Nelson Rockefeller. (Teddy knew Nelson Rockefeller because of his work as a consultant to the Rockefeller Family Trust.) Nelson had held some appointed offices in the Roosevelt and Eisenhower administrations, and at the time I met him I believe he was undersecretary of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and also a special advisor to President Eisenhower on foreign affairs.

Nelson was committed to a career in public service (rather than politics) and, being a conscientious man, he was undertaking an assessment of the needs of the nation to prepare himself for political office. I was honored when Nelson asked me to join the study group, even though that meant foregoing my interest in being a consultant to the Family Trust, an invitation that Laurance Rockefeller had issued. I considered the work of the study group an important and interesting project. And so it proved. Nelson's study group provided me my first real (although not necessarily fully realistic) introduction to the world of American political thought.

In one respect, Rockefeller was the most unusual political figure I have known. All politicians in my experience listen to advice. Some of them listen

-453-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Memoirs: A Twentieth-Century Journey in Science and Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 628

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.