Corpse: Nature, Forensics, and the Struggle to Pinpoint Time of Death

By Jessica Snyder Sachs | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

THE NAMES OF my many coauthors could never fit on a book jacket, let alone a single page. I can only begin to thank the scores of scientists, librarians, and media information specialists who graciously submitted themselves to my endless questions and requests for obscure historical and scientific information. Special thanks go to the pathologists, anthropologists, entomologists, and botanists who have reviewed my accounts of their work. Any inaccuracies that have managed to survive their vetting remain utterly my own. For reasons unknown but greatly appreciated, several of these researchers have taken an extraordinary interest in my work, with patient tutoring and feedback that goes far beyond their too-brief mention in the text. They include most especially Germany's peerless "Herr Maggot," Mark Benecke, Virginia Commonwealth University's Jason Byrd, Rob Hall of the University of Missouri, "Wild Man" Neal Haskell of Saint Joseph's College, and retired USDA entomologist Jerry Payne.

Thanks also go out to Joyce Adkins, widow of the late forensic entomologist Ted Adkins, for trusting me with her husband's papers and David Faulkner, of the San Diego Natural History Museum, for trusting me with his own; Tracy Cyr for our e-mail discussions of insect minutiae; forensic anthropologists Bill Bass, William Haglund, and Clyde Snow for the delightful ways they

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Corpse: Nature, Forensics, and the Struggle to Pinpoint Time of Death
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Prologue i
  • 1 - The Body Handlers 11
  • 2 - Reasonable Doubt 27
  • 3 - The Bone Detectives 47
  • 4 - The Witness Was a Maggot 69
  • 5 - Bug Sleuthing Crosses the Atlantic 93
  • 6 - A Model for Murder 119
  • 7 - The Dirty Dozen 147
  • 8 - Perfecting the Postmortem Clock 171
  • 9 - Plants, Pollen, and Perpetrators 197
  • 10 - The Pathologist's Garden 219
  • 11 - Chemical Clues 229
  • 12 - The New Mod Squad 247
  • Further Reading 259
  • Index 261
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