Reforming Fictions: Native, African, and Jewish American Women's Literature and Journalism in the Progressive Era

By Carol J. Batker | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
Emerging from under the shadow of a modernist criticism and canon focussed on such authors as T. S. Eliot, Ernest Hemingway, and William Faulkner, early twentieth-century writing has lately been reframed and reclaimed as a much wider and more complicated field. Critics such as Elizabeth Ammons, Laura Doyle, Ann duCille, Rachel Blau Duplessis, Philip Harper, Michael North, Priscilla Wald, and many, many others have revealed the ways in which fiction of the 1910s, '20s, and '30s took shape not despite or apart from but rather around and through the racial, ethnic, gender, and class conflicts of the era.
2
For overviews of Zitkala-Sa's political activism, see David L. Johnson and Raymond Wilson, Deborah Sue Welch, William Willard, “The First Amendment,”and “Zitkala-Sa: A Woman Who Would Be Heard,”and Walter L. Williams.
3
For biographical information on Dunbar-Nelson, see Gloria Hull, Give Us Each Day and Color, Sex, and Poetry 33–103.
4
For biographical information on Fannie Hurst, see Cynthia Brandimarte and Susan Koppleman. On Hurst's relationship with African American communities, see Wilentz, “White Patron.”
5
See Bernardin, Brown, Fisher, and Viehmann for readings of McWhorter as an intrusive but politically sympathetic editor (Brown, “Mourning Dove's Voice”; Fisher, “Introduction”). For discussions of editorial appropriation in Cogewea, see Mary Dearborn, Pocahontas's Daughters 23 and Elizabeth Ammons, Conflicting Stories 138. All of these accounts use an

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