The Sacred and the Secular University

By Jon H. Roberts; James Turner | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

JON ROBERTS is principally responsible for Part I, on the sciences, James Turner for Part II, on the humanities. But having discussed each other's successive drafts over a period of years, we have reached agreement on all substantial issues and regard ourselves as collectively responsible for the book as a whole.

Both of us wish to acknowledge the generous support of the Mellon Foundation, which provided funds that made the research for and writing of this book possible, and the even more generous assistance of John F. Wilson, who has overseen this project since its origins, giving freely of his time and intelligence, despite the demands on his energy made by his position as dean of the graduate school at Princeton University. To that university and its president Harold Shapiro and to the Mellon Foundation's president William Bowen, we are grateful for the opportunity to present early versions of this work at the conference celebrating Princeton's 250th anniversary. The many archivists and librarians who cheerfully aided our research deserve more thanks than words can afford.

For helpful comments on earlier versions of the manuscript, we are both grateful to George Marsden and two anonymous readers for Princeton University Press. In addition, James Turner thanks Jean Heffer, Francç;ois Weil, and Pap Ndiaye of the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales and the members of the History Department Colloquium and of the Intellectual History Seminar of the University of Notre Dame for their kind criticism. He also appreciates the willingness of Professors Stephen Alter and Caroline Winterer to let him raid their well-stocked stores of ideas and information.

Jon Roberts thanks Christine Neidlein, Colleen Angel, and the other members of the staff at the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point Interlibrary Loan Office for gracious, often heroic assistance. Members of the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin–Stevens Point gave him helpful feedback when he presented an abridged version of his contribution to this book at one of the Department's monthly brownbag lunch sessions. William B. Skelton provided a careful and intelligent reading of an earlier draft of this work. Ronald L. Numbers has read three versions and each time provided Roberts with his typically superb editorial and substantive advice. Daniel Thurs, a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin–Madison who is currently writing a dissertation on the history of the meaning of the term scientific method in the United States, graciously gave Roberts confidence that his own views on that subject were on target. His special appreciation, as always, to Sharon (ILYS) and Jeff. They continue to make it all worthwhile.

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Sacred and the Secular University
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 184

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.