The Tet Offensive

By Marc Jason Gilbert; William Head | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Dr. Kissinger's remarks come from Henry Kissinger, The White House Years ( Boston: Little, Brown, 1979).
2.
See Donald Oberdorfer, Tet! (Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday, 1971), [hereafter Tet!].
3.
Ibid.
.
The aforementioned general facts on the Tet Offensive come from ibid.
5.
For more information on the Communist planning of the Tet Offensive, see ibid.; Vo Nguyen Giap, "Big Victory, Great Task" ( New York: Praeger, 1968).
6.
This quote can be found in Tran Van Tra, Vietnam: History of the Bulwark B2 Theatre, Volume 5, Concluding the 30-Years War ( Ho Chi Minh City: Van Nghe Publishing House, 1982).
7.
Ibid.
8.
Tra's book mentioned above alludes to such a suggestion.
9.
For views on the effects of the U.S. media on the war and on how Tet was perceived see Peter Braestrup, Big Story!, 2 volumes (Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press, 1977). In his memoirs Westmoreland discusses his role in Tet and his belief that Tet was a great victory which could have led to complete victory with 250,000 additional troops; see A Soldier Reports ( New York: Doubleday, 1976).
10.
Johnson's attitudes and his "public relations" effort before Tet can be found in his autobiography The Vantage Point: Perspectives of the Presidency, 1963-1969 ( New York: Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1971) and Larry Berman Lyndon Johnson's War: The Road to Stalemate in Vietnam ( New York: Norton, 1989) [hereafter Lyndon Johnson's War]. Another excellent source for these issues is The Pentagon Papers: The Defense Department History of United States Decision Making in Vietnam, U.S. Senator Gravel edition ( Boston: Beacon, 1971).
11.
For details on Tet as a psychological turning point see Oberdorfer, Tet!.
12.
For an extended view of the mood in Saigon following Tet, see Bui Diem and David Chanoff, In the Jaws of History ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1987). For a detailed view of the mood in Washington see Berman, Lyndon Johnson's War.
13.
In her analysis, The Viet Cong in Saigon: Tactics and Objectives during the Tet Offensive ( Santa Monica, Calif.: Rand Corporation, 1969), Victoria Pohle agrees that the Saigon leadership was very confident immediately following Tet. However, she believes that they came to understand that the United States might pull out sooner, and with fateful results. In any case, once this was understood everyone realized that without the United States, as things stood in 1968, it would be very difficult to preserve the South Vietnamese government.

-134-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Tet Offensive
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 288

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.