Einstein, Picasso: Space, Time and the Beauty That Causes Havoc

By Arthur I. Miller | Go to book overview
Save to active project

5
BRAQUE AND PICASSO
EXPLORE SPACE

At that time our work was a kind of laboratory research from which every pretension of individual vanity was excluded. You have to understand that state of mind.

—Pablo Picasso

After Les Demoiselles d'Avignon opened the floodgates of Picasso's creativity, there followed seven years of productivity unequalled in the history of art. In this work Picasso joined forces with Georges Braque, in a partnership without precedent.

Seven months younger than Picasso, Braque was originally trained as a decorator and housepainter. In about 1902 he decided on a career as an artist and moved to Paris, where he settled in Montmartre on rue d'Orsel, a few hundred meters from the Bateau Lavoir. After two years of formal art training, Braque began his career in the fauve tradition and achieved some success. Becoming disillusioned with fauvism, he sought another means of representation. The Cézanne retrospective that commenced at the Salon d'Automne on 1 October, 1907, gave Braque the clue as to how to proceed.

Once they became friends, the interactions between Braque and Picasso intensified until by 1910 they were seeing each other almost daily. Braque likened their closeness to a cordée en montagne, the rope connecting two mountaineers as they scale an unconquered peak. 1 At the time of

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Einstein, Picasso: Space, Time and the Beauty That Causes Havoc
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 357

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?