Einstein, Picasso: Space, Time and the Beauty That Causes Havoc

By Arthur I. Miller | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER 1
1.
Arnheim (1962), p. 13.
2.
Richardson (1980), p. 24.
3.
Avant-garde has been rightly called a "slippery concept" (Cottington, 1998, p. 37). Since I am not writing a history of art that depends on detailed comparisons between eras, I am rescued from participating in this debate. I will use the term "avant-garde" in the following direct way in which, in fact, according to Cottington, it was commonly understood from about 1900. Avant-garde groups of artists and writers were those who rebelled against academic convention and bourgeois taste, which included its social, moral and aesthetic dimensions. As the cultural capital of Europe, aspiring artists and writers began to migrate to Paris in the 1880s. At the turn of the twentieth century these loose groups began to form communities, the principal one in Montmartre. At that time an identifiable and separate subcommunity of artists emerged with the definite goal of a countercultural transformation, and the term "avant-garde" began to be applied to them. For further discussion see Cottington (1998), esp. Chapter 2. See also Weiss (1994), p. xvi, and elsewhere, where he makes the point that certain present-day theories of the avant-garde bear little relation to archival evidence. Weiss uses "avant-garde" and "modernism" interchangeably. I have chosen to avoid the term "modernism" altogether. Certain contemporaneous theories of art attempt to furnish definitions of modernism that are separate from avant‐ gardism and that are imposed on historical events. These definitions are based on views formulated decades after the fact and are usually rooted in the formalist art theory of Clement Greenberg. Rather I want to demonstrate how Picasso's discoveries emerge from the artistic and scientific cultures as we are informed from archival evidence or from secondary sources as near to 1907 as is currently possible to obtain. Regarding cubism, Christopher Green has pungently argued that "something dubbed 'Modernism"' presents a "diversionary caricature" of historical developments (Green, 1987, p. 2). In his fascinating overview of intellectual developments during 1880-1918, Kern (1987) avoids altogether the terms

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Einstein, Picasso: Space, Time and the Beauty That Causes Havoc
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • 1 - Two Worlds as One 1
  • 2 - A Good-Looking Bootblack 9
  • 3 - The Kind of Male Beauty That Caused Such Havoc 41
  • 4 - How Picasso Discovered Les Demoiselles D'Avignon 85
  • 5 - Braque and Picasso Explore Space 127
  • Intermezzo 173
  • 6 - The Annus Mirabilis: How Einstein Discovered Relativity 179
  • 7 - I Really Would Not Have Thought Einstein Capable of That! 215
  • 8 - Creativity in Art and Science 237
  • Notes 269
  • Bibliography 323
  • Photo Credits 341
  • Index 345
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