Crisis Intervention: Theory and Methodology

By Donna C. Aguilera | Go to book overview

PREFACE

The eighth edition of this text acknowledges the fact that crisis intervention is being widely used by those in the helping professions. Individuals from all walks of life and age groups and with diverse problems and varying cultural backgrounds have responded to the skilled use of crisis intervention. It is being used by professionals and nonprofessionals with a wide range of skills.

It was felt that there was still a need for an overview and a guide to crisis intervention, from its historical development to its present utilization. The techniques and skills of a therapist must be learned and practiced under professional supervision. However, it is believed that an awareness of the basic theory and principles of crisis intervention will be valuable to all who are involved in the helping professions. This book should be a particularly meaningful mode of intervention for those who have constant and intimate contact with individuals and families in stressful situations (those who seek help because they are unable to cope alone and situations that may be biological, sociological, or psychological in origin).

Chapter 1 presents the historical development of crisis intervention methodology. Its intent is to create an awareness of the broad base of knowledge incorporated in its present practice. Looking to the future, a discussion of potential crises that may result from society's technological advances is new to this edition.

Chapter 2 deals with the differences between psychotherapeutic techniques of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy and between brief psychotherapy and crisis intervention methodology. It presents the major goals of these methods of treatment, foci, activities of the therapist, indications for treatment, average length of treatment, and the approximate cost to the individual. New to this chapter is the introduction of cognitive therapy and its utilization in crisis intervention with depressed patients.

Chapter 3 introduces the paradigms and illustrates their utilization in case studies. It focuses on the problem-solving process and introduces the reader to basic terminology used in this method of treatment. The paradigm clarifies the sequential steps of crisis development. Two case studies, with paradigms, illustrate its application as a guide to the case studies that are presented in subsequent chapters. New to this chapter is a discussion of the biophysiological components of stress, since individuals in crisis are under stress.

Also new to this edition are blank paradigms for the reader to complete for each case study in the text. The reader can then compare that paradigm with completed paradigms that are presented in Appendix D to evaluate his knowledge of crisis intervention. It is hoped that this interactive method will prove useful in learning and applying knowledge about the crisis intervention process.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crisis Intervention: Theory and Methodology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 335

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.