Crisis Intervention: Theory and Methodology

By Donna C. Aguilera | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Violence in
Our Society

Assassination has never changed the history of the world.

—Benjamin Disraeli

The twentieth century has not been very tranquil or serene. Seldom does a week go by that we are not confronted by the news of violent acts of apparent random killing, rape, kidnapping, spousal abuse, abuse of the elderly, child abuse and neglect, or murder. There have been a multitude of traumatic events. It appears that violence is escalating in our lives and in the lives of those we love. Perhaps the violence we encounter in our lives does not always appear in banner headlines. Sometimes it does appear as a headline for a brief period, but it neither affects as many people nor receives the same notoriety over a lengthy period.

This chapter presents some of the events that occur daily, maybe not to us personally, but they still affect us. How can we as individuals not care when we read about children being neglected, sexually abused, or murdered by their family members or caretakers. Do we not identify with the wife or husband when we read that a husband has killed his wife and their three children because she has been unable to contend with his verbal and physical abuse and leaves him, seeking a divorce? Aren't we concerned about our children's exposure to drugs and violence in schools and with their peers? We are, of course, very concerned when we read of "gangs" who shoot and kill innocent young boys and girls because they were thought to be members of a "rival" gang. The police in most metropolitan cities are understaffed, overworked, and underpaid. They try to do the best they can, but they can only do so much.

In the November 6, 1996, Los Angeles Times, Boyer wrote, "A former city electrician was found guilty of slaying four city workers. He faces the death penalty after being convicted of killing four of his supervisors at the city's downtown technical center. Police said that he went to the communications area, where he worked as a radio repairman. He had an angry discussion there with someone about his performance and left, returning shortly with a Glock semiautomatic pistol. He

-76-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Crisis Intervention: Theory and Methodology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 335

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.