The Most Dangerous Man in Detroit: Walter Reuther and the Fate of American Labor

By Nelson Lichtenstein | Go to book overview

NOTES

CHAPTER 1: FATHER AND SONS
1.
Wheeling [W.V.] Daily Intelligencer, December 10, 1903, quoted in Paul Douglass, "The Reuther Family and the Rewarding Society, 1972," file 20, box 68, Victor G. Reuther Collection (hereafter cited as VGR Collection).
2.
Daily Intelligencer, December 24, 1903, quoted in Victor G. Reuther, The Brothers Reuther and the Story of the UAW (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1976), 25.
3.
David T. Javersak, "One Place on This Great Green Planet Where Andrew Carnegie Can't Get a Monument to His Money," West Virginia History 44 (1981): 15-17.
4.
See, for example, Leon Fink, Workingmen's Democracy: The Knights of Labor and American Politics (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1983); Nick Salvatore, Eugene V Debs: Citizen and Socialist (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1984); Roy Rosenzweig, Eight Hours for What We Will: Workers and Leisure in an Industrial City (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1983).
5.
Javersak, "One Place on This Great Green Planet," 19.
6.
Douglass, "Reuther Family," 11.
7.
The world of steelworkers and steel masters is discussed in two classic works: David Brody, Steelworkers in America: The Non-Union Era (New York: Harper & Row, 1960); and David Montgomery, The Fall of the House of Labor: The Workplace, the State, and American Labor Activism, 1865-1925 (New York: Cambridge University Press, 1987).
8.
Reuther, Brothers Reuther, 12-14; see also Dorothee Schneider, Trade Unions and Community: The German Working Class in New York City, 1870-1900 (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1994), 130-36, 172-76, 207-17; John Laslett, Labor and the Left: A Study of Socialist and Radical Influences in the American Labor Movement, 1889-1924 (New York: Basic Books, 1970), 32-43.
9.
Hartmut Keil, "German Working-class Radicalism in the United States from the 1870s to World War I," in "Struggle a Hard Battle": Essays on Working-Class Immigrants, ed. Dirk Hoerder (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 1986), 71-94; Salvatore, Debs, 222-26; Irving Howe, Socialism and America (San Diego: Harcourt

-447-

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