Asia's Computer Challenge: Threat or Opportunity for the United States & the World?

By Jason Dedrick; Kenneth L. Kraemer | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1.
Paul Krugman, "Competitiveness: A Dangerous Obsession," Foreign Affairs 73 ( March-April1994): 28-35.
2.
For a good review and analysis of various points of view on national competitiveness, see David P. Rapkin and Jonathan R. Strand, "Is International Competitiveness a Meaningful Concept?" in C. Roe Goddard, John T. Passe-Smith, and John G. Conklin (eds.), International Political Economy: State-Market Relations in the Changing Global Order ( Boulder, Colo.: Lynne Rienner, 1996): 109-129.
3.
Robert B. Reich, "Who Is Us?" Harvard Business Review ( January-February 1991): 53-59.
4.
Laura D'Andrea Tyson, "They Are Not Us: Why American Ownership Still Matters," American Prospect (winter 1991): 37-49.
5.
Shintaro Ishihara, The Japan That Can Say No: Why Japan Will Be First Among Equals ( New York: Simon and Schuster, 1991).
6.
Andrew Pollack, "Breaking Out of Japan's Orbit," New York Times ( January 30, 1996).
7.
U.S. Department of Commerce/International Trade Administration, U.S. Industry and Trade Outlook, 1998 ( New York: McGraw-Hill, 1998).
8.
Several analysts, such as Stephen S. Roach and Martin N. Baily, argued that computer investment was not having a measurable impact on productivity, based on historical evidence from the United States. Stephen S. Roach, White-Collar Productivity: A Glimmer of Hope? ( New York: Morgan Stanley, 1988); Martin N. Baily, "What Has Happened to Productivity Growth?" Science 234 ( October 1986): 443-451. More recently, however, research by Erik Brynjolfsson and Loren Hitt and by Frank R. Lichtenberg has found evidence that computer investment has high rates of return at the company level, while Kenneth L. Kraemer and Jason Dedrick found a strong correlation between computer investment and productivity growth in twelve Asia-Pacific countries. Erik Brynjolfsson and Loren Hitt, "Paradox Lost? Firm-level Evidence on the Returns to Information Systems Spending," Management Science, 42 ( April 1996): 541-558; Frank R. Lichtenberg, The Output Contributions of Computer Equipment and Personnel: A Firm-Level Analysis, Working Paper No. 4540 ( Cambridge, Mass.: National Bureau of Economic Research, 1993); Kenneth L. Kraemer and Jason Dedrick, "PayoffsFrom Investment in Information Technology: Lessons from the Asia-Pacific Region,"

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Asia's Computer Challenge: Threat or Opportunity for the United States & the World?
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface and Acknowledgments v
  • Contents xi
  • List of Figures xv
  • List of Tables xvii
  • 1 - Competing in Computers 3
  • 2 - Globalization of the Computer Industry 28
  • Conclusions 71
  • 3 - Japan and the PC Revolution 76
  • Summary 90
  • Summary 104
  • Conclusions 113
  • 4 - Asia's New Competitors 116
  • Conclusions 143
  • Conclusions 172
  • 5 - Asia's New Competitors 174
  • Conclusions 209
  • 6 - Findings from the East Asian Experience 211
  • 7 - Lessons for Companies and Countries 254
  • Summary 263
  • Conclusions 278
  • 8 - Competing in Computers in the Network Era 280
  • Conclusion - Asia's Computer Challenge 319
  • Appendix 321
  • Notes 325
  • References 343
  • Index 353
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