Crossing Swords: Politics and Religion in Mexico

By Roderic Ai Camp | Go to book overview
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ing those which exist not only between the Church and the government, but among other groups and government as well.


NOTES
1.
In fact, the emphasis on the political implications of recent change within the Catholic Church is so strong that its pastoral orientation--its focus on evangelization, bringing people into a relationship with God, Christ, and the Church--is largely ignored. Thomas G. Sanders , "The Puebla Conference," American Universities Field Staff Reports, no. 30, 1979, 6.
2.
Daniel H. Levine, "From Church and State to Religion and Politics and Back Again," World Affairs 150 (Fall 1987): 94.
3.
As Brian Smith concluded two decades ago: "Classic studies of the impact of religion on society, written in the latter part of the nineteenth and early twentieth century, arrived at the same general conclusion: Religion is predominantly an integrating and legitimizing force for the prevailing values and structures in society and is not a motivating force for social change." Religion and Social Change: Classical Theories and New Formulations in the Content of Recent Developments in Latin America, Latin American Research Review 10 ( 1975): 4.
4.
Octavio Rodríguez Araujo, "Iglesia, partidos and lucha de clases en México," in Religión y política en México, Martín de la Rosa and Charles A. Reilly, eds. ( Mexico City: Siglo XXI, 1985), 262; Soledad Loaeza, "Notas para el estudio de la Iglesia en el México contemporáneo," Religión y política en México, 49.
5.
Brian H. Smith, "Church and Human Rights in Latin America," Journal of Inter- American Studies and World Affairs 21 ( February 1979): 118.
6.
Los Angeles Times, April 19, 1992.
7.
Soledad Loaeza, "La Iglesia católica mexicana y el reformismo autoritario," Foro Internacional 25, no. 2 ( October-December 1984): 142. I am not suggesting, however, that Catholicism necessarily provides a strong, cultural unity in Latin America or Mexico.
8.
Carol Ann Drogus, "Religious Change and Women's Status in Latin America: A Comparison of Catholic Base Communities and Pentecostal Churches," Kellog Institute for International Studies, University of Notre Dame, 1993, 3.
9.
Douglas C. Bennett, "Catholicism, Capitalism, and the State in the Development of Mexico," in Global Economics and Religion, James Finn, ed. ( New Brunswick, N.J.: Transaction Books, 1983), 139.
10.
Charles L. Davis, "Religion and Partisan Loyalty: The Case of Catholic Workers in Mexico," Western Political Quarterly 45 ( March 1992): 276. Indeed, elsewhere, Kenneth Coleman and Charles L. Davis argue that modes of interaction between citizens and religious authorities may have been extended to political authority structures, favoring Mexican elite behavior. "Civil and Conventional Religion in Secular Authoritarian Regimes: The Case of Mexico," Studies in Comparative International Development 13, no. 2 (Summer 1978): 57.
11.
Kenneth P. Langton, "The Church, Social Consciousness, and Protest," Comparative Political Studies 19 ( October 1986): 327.
12.
Larissa Adler Lomnitz and Marisol Pérez-Lizaur, A Mexican Elite Family, 1820- 1980 ( Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987). 204.
13.
Soledad Loaeza, "Continuity and Change in the Mexican Catholic Church," in

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