Holding Government Bureaucracies Accountable

By Bernard Rosen | Go to book overview

agencies such as personnel, procurement, and budget policies. The purposes of the NPR were to identify problems, propose solutions for making the government work better and cost less, and initiate a process of continuous improvement.5

The idea for this book was born after the author had served in the federal bureaucracy for more than 30 years and began teaching courses in public administration. Although the substance and processes of accountability grow large in importance for public administrators as their responsibilities increase, no single work has focused on the subject as a whole in terms of current policies and practices. I believe this book helps fill that need for students, teachers, and managers and other professionals in government. For courses in public management, politics of administration, public personnel administration, Congress, and the presidency, it would be a useful companion text to facilitate discussion and understanding of this overriding issue. Those studying business administration or in business and concerned with the relations between government and business will find that accountability policies and processes translate into opportunities for legitimate intervention in the decision-making processes of government.

With citizen expectations continuing to outrun funded governmental capacity, holding government bureaucracies accountable is a long-term, high- priority concern for the governed and the governors.


NOTES
1.
James Madison, "The House of Representatives", in Hamilton, Madison, and Jay on the Constitution, ed. Ralph H. Gabriel ( New York: The Liberal Arts Press, 1954), pp. 111-15.
2.
Chief Financial Officer Act of 1990, Public Law 101-576.
3.
The Government Performance and Results Act, 1993, Public Law103-62.
4.
The Government Management Reform Act, 1994, Public Law 103-356.
5.
Creating a Government that Works Better and Costs Less, Report of the National Performance Review, 1993, and additional NPR reports issued in subsequent years of the Clinton administration.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Holding Government Bureaucracies Accountable
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I - The Substance of Accountability 1
  • 1 - Public Administrators: Accountable for What? 3
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Public Administrators: Accountable to Whom? 19
  • Notes 31
  • Part II - The Processes of Accountability 33
  • 3 - Accountability Processes Within the Executive Branch 35
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - Accountability Mechanisms and Methods Used by the Legislative Branch 63
  • Notes 88
  • 5 - Citizen Participation in the Accountability Processes 91
  • Notes 115
  • 6 - Judicial Review of Administrative Actions 117
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - Other Instruments for Accountability 137
  • Notes 172
  • Part III - The Future 177
  • 8 - New Initiatives for Improving Accountability 179
  • Notes 205
  • 9 - In Retrospect 209
  • Notes 221
  • Selected Bibliography 223
  • Index 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.