Holding Government Bureaucracies Accountable

By Bernard Rosen | Go to book overview
Save to active project

World War II in a fourfold growth in number of employees in the House and Senate, despite the three percent reduction after the Republicans became the majority in 1994.42

Consequently, it is increasingly common that professional staff members, under the aegis of a committee or subcommittee, fill some of the gap created by more requirements for oversight and members' own lack of time for personal participation. Often young, almost always well-educated, bright, and highly motivated, many professional staff members have been heavily involved in overseeing the bureaucracy. While their activities overall are in accord with the members' general views, there is some uneasiness in Congress and the agencies about the extent to which their personal values and priorities, rather than those of the members, influence program administrators on many specific questions that arise in the course of oversight.

The range of means available for legislative oversight is formidable. The very fact that means exist and can be brought to bear on the bureaucracy is in itself a powerful deterrent to wrongdoing. Many instances can be cited where this enormous capacity has been used effectively. For positive results over a sustained period, the work of the Senate Committee to Investigate the National Defense Program during World War II, chaired by then Senator Harry Truman, is considered a classic. The Committee's motto was, "There is no substitute for a fact."43 In seeking an effective execution of laws, the Committee was instrumental in prodding the military departments and other wartime agencies to make changes that improved our fighting capacity, reduced delays in production of war materiel, and saved billions of dollars.

Numerous proposals have been made for improving legislative oversight. Former Comptroller General Elmer Staats, on the occasion of completing his 15-year term, expressed the view that Congress could improve its oversight by being "more specific and realistic when establishing goals and expectations for policies, programs, and administrative reforms," and by focusing "more of its analysis, debate, and actions on broad policy areas . . . with a much longer time horizon in mind."44 The Chief Financial Officer Act, the Government Performance and Results Act, the Government Management and Reform Act, and other laws passed in the 1990s, when fully implemented as discussed in Chapter 8, will make possible improved legislative oversight.


NOTES
1.
60 Stat. 132, Sect. 136 ( 1946).
2.
82 Stat. 1098 ( 1968).
3.
84 Stat. 1140 ( 1970).
4.
88 Stat. 297 ( 1974).
5.
Public Law 103-62.

-88-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Holding Government Bureaucracies Accountable
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.