Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation

By Robert I. Rotberg | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Economic Costs of Conflict in Sri Lanka

Saman Kelegama

SRI LANKA'S long civil war has exacted an enormous economic cost in terms of lost productivity, lost investment, and misallocated resources, resulting in a lower standard of living than would have been possible in a peacetime setting. Although ethnic conflict had taken place for several years, it became a burden on the economy only after 1983, when the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) commenced a guerrilla war against the state. For convenience of reference it is called the Eelam War (I, II, and III). Eelam War I started in 1983 and continued until 1987 when the Indian Peace Keeping Force established itself in commanding positions in the north and the east. With the collapse of peace talks initiated in early 1990, Eelam War II started in June 1990 and continued until December 1994. Eelam War III, which commenced in mid-April 1995, continues to date. This chapter analyzes the economic aspects of the war, with special reference to Eelam wars I and II.


Background

At the time of independence in 1948, Sri Lanka had very promising initial economic conditions, so much so that Oliver Goonetilleke, the first governor-general of Sri Lanka, stated that, of all post-colonial nations, Ceylon ( Sri Lanka) would prove the "best bet in Asia." Even by 1960, Sri Lanka's economy was on a fairly sound footing, with per capita income at U.S. $141--comparable to that of South

-71-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.