Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation

By Robert I. Rotberg | Go to book overview
ments. Nonetheless, the draft constitution, in deviating and moving away from an entrenched unitary state, has brought about a paradigm shift considered vital to a meaningful sharing of power between regions and communities.
Conclusion
The constitutional reform proposals undoubtedly represent the boldest efforts so far toward ethnic reconciliation, but are they adequate, given the magnitude of the crisis facing Sri Lankan society? Critics have argued that they fall significantly short of the principles advanced by all of the major Tamil formations at the political negotiations conducted in Thimphu, Bhutan. The four principles placed before the Sri Lankan government were
1. --(1) The recognition of the Tamils of Sri Lanka as a distinct nationality.
2. --(2) The recognition of an identified Tamil homeland and guarantee of its territorial integrity.
3. --(3) Based on the above, recognition of the inalienable right of self-determin-ation of the Tamil nation.
4. --(4) Recognition of the right to full citizenship and other fundamental democratic rights of all Tamils who look upon the island as their country.

The political structure for the resolution of the conflict was intended to be based on the recognition of these principles. It is an examination of these principles that has led some commentators to advocate the need for a new initiative, based on "the core aspirations of the Tamil people." The Indo-Sri Lanka Accord, by its emphasis on the need to nurture and protect distinct identities and by its acknowledgment that the northeast province constitutes the traditional habitation of Tamils and Muslims, provided an implicit acknowledgment of some of the Thimphu concepts. However, the mere symbolic acknowledgement of the definition of the national problem and the nature of Tamil national identity does not, per se, lead to a resolution. At the core of the Thimphu principles are substantive political arrangements for the redefinition of the nature of the state and the sharing of sovereign legislative and executive powers between the regions. The quest for a political resolution within a united Sri Lanka must therefore relate more to the substantive issues relating to the exercise of political power than to abstract formulations of political identity.

[ Tiruchelvam was murdered ( July 29, 1999) before he could add several paragraphs to this chapter about the latest constitutional devolutionary proposals that he had prepared for President Kumaratunga and that she was about to introduce in Sri Lanka's parliament. They are consistent with the views in this chapter.]

-200-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Creating Peace in Sri Lanka: Civil War and Reconciliation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 224

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.