Holding Government Bureaucracies Accountable

By Bernard Rosen | Go to book overview

In addition, EPA should initiate a budget and strategic planning process that will ensure that resources are devoted to the most critical, high-risk environmental problems. EPA should ensure that the goals it is developing are based on sound science, real risks, benefits and costs, and are supported by the public.30

It is worth noting that NAPA's recommendations included legislative as well as administrative changes, and the subcommittee welcomed both.


SUMMING UP

In the competition for attention of decision makers in legislative bodies and executive agencies, more so than most special interest groups, the better government groups have at least two of three very valuable assets: dedicated and talented members, large constituencies, and great appeal for the news media. In the long run, these may provide a significant counterweight to those interest groups that have vast economic power and the will to use it to influence government decision makers in ways that benefit the special interests, but may be adverse to the public interest.

Citizen participation in holding government bureaucracies accountable is most effective when administrators recognize that such initiative is firmly grounded in two core values of constitutional democracy--political equality and liberty--and when that recognition leads to creation of an environment that encourages citizen involvement with the work of the agency. Fulfillment of these conditions can lead to more realistic expectations on the part of citizens, better responsiveness of administrators to the needs of citizens and, ultimately, greater confidence in the administrative institutions of government.


NOTES
1.
U.S. Congress, Senate, Committee on the Judiciary, Hearing on S. 2715, Public Participation in Federal Agency Proceedings, 94th Cong., 2d sess., 1976, p. 86.
2.
94 Stat. 376 ( 1975); 90 Stat. 2023 ( 1976); 94 Star. 1681 ( 1980).
3.
Comptroller General of the United States, B-139703, December 3, 1976.
4.
Executive Order 12369, June 30, 1982.
5.
Charles H. Levine, ed., The Unfinished Agenda for Civil Service Reform, Implications of the Grace Commission Report ( Washington, D.C.: The Brookings Institution, 1985), pp. 3-4.
6.
Report of the Task Force on Personnel Management of the President's Private Sector Survey on Cost Control, Hearing Before the Subcommittee on Investigations of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, 98th Cong., 1st sess., 1983, p. 57.
7.
News Release, House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, April 14, 1983.
8.
Bernard Rosen, "Civil Service Reform: Are the Constraints Impenetrable?"

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Holding Government Bureaucracies Accountable
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Notes xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Part I - The Substance of Accountability 1
  • 1 - Public Administrators: Accountable for What? 3
  • Notes 17
  • 2 - Public Administrators: Accountable to Whom? 19
  • Notes 31
  • Part II - The Processes of Accountability 33
  • 3 - Accountability Processes Within the Executive Branch 35
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - Accountability Mechanisms and Methods Used by the Legislative Branch 63
  • Notes 88
  • 5 - Citizen Participation in the Accountability Processes 91
  • Notes 115
  • 6 - Judicial Review of Administrative Actions 117
  • Notes 134
  • 7 - Other Instruments for Accountability 137
  • Notes 172
  • Part III - The Future 177
  • 8 - New Initiatives for Improving Accountability 179
  • Notes 205
  • 9 - In Retrospect 209
  • Notes 221
  • Selected Bibliography 223
  • Index 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 234

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.