Market Dominance: How Firms Gain, Hold, or Lose It and the Impact on Economic Performance

By David I. Rosenbaum | Go to book overview

began using alliances with other companies to branch out into new imaging markets like Photo CD and Internet photographic uses. More importantly, Kodak is attempting to get rid of corporate fat and refocus on its core strength in the imaging market. Recent court rulings may have given Kodak ammunition to fight back for its market dominance, for example, the removal of the no-tying clause for selling film and photofinishing, and the removal of the no store-brand film sales by Kodak.

Several challenges and threats lie ahead for Kodak, including bringing the electronic technology to mass market, resuscitating the traditional photography market, and focusing on global markets, among others. Time will tell whether Kodak is up to facing these challenges and regaining its old imposing dominance in the twenty-first century.


NOTES
1.
J. Brock, "Market Control in the amateur photography industry," Ph.D. dissertation, Michigan State University.
2.
Wolfman Report on the Photographic and Imaging Industry in the U.S. ( 1969-96). New York: ABC Leisure magazines.
3.
Berkey Photo Inc. v Eastman Kodak Company. ( 1979) 603 F2d. Henceforth, Berkey v Kodak.
4.
Forbes, 1 April 1963.
5.
Berkey v Kodak.
6.
"From Glass Plates to Digital Images: The Kodak Story," Pamphlet published by Eastman Kodak Company, 1994.
7.
R. Jenkins, Images and Enterprise: Technology and the American Photographic Industry 1839 to 1925 ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1975).
8.
From Glass Plates to Digital Images: The Kodak Story. Kodak document, 1994.
9.
Berkey v Kodak.
10.
Berkey v Kodak.
11.
Berkey v Kodak.
12.
Jenkins, Images and Enterprise.
13.
Jenkins, Images and Enterprise.
14.
Jenkins, Images and Enterprise. C. Ackerman, George Eastman ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1930).
15.
Berkey v Kodak.
16.
Berkey v Kodak.
17.
J. Levin, "The Potential Entrant and the Decision about Entry: Two Case Studies," Ph.D. dissertation, Boston College, 1985.
18.
Levin, "Potential Entrant."
19.
Levin, "Potential Entrant."
20.
Fortune, 22 August, 1983, p. 122.
21.
Forbes, 22 November, 1982, p. 56.
22.
Business Week, 24 October, 1983, pp. 88, 92.
23.
V. Kadiyal, "Pricing and Advertising Strategies for Entry and Accommodation: The Case of the U.S. Photographic Film Industry," Ph.D. dissertation, Dept. of Economics, Northwestern University, 1994. V. Kadiyal, "Entry, Its Deterrence and Its Accommodation: A Study of the U.S. Photographic Film Industry", Rand Journal of Economics, 1996.

-107-

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Market Dominance: How Firms Gain, Hold, or Lose It and the Impact on Economic Performance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • 1 - Introduction 1
  • Notes 9
  • 2 - Dominance in the Oil Industry: Standard Oil from 1865 to 1911 11
  • Notes 33
  • 3 - Tobacco: Predation and Persistent Market Power 39
  • Notes 51
  • 4 - Alcoa and the U.S. Aluminum Industry 55
  • Notes 66
  • 5 - Dow Chemical and the Magnesium Industry 69
  • Notes 86
  • 6 - Eastman Kodak in the Photographic Film Industry: Picture Imperfect? 89
  • Notes 107
  • 7 - The Rise and Fall of Ford and General Motors in the U.S. Automobile Industry: A Tale Twice Told 109
  • Notes 126
  • 8 - The Rise and Fall of IBM 131
  • Notes 150
  • 9 - Microsoft 153
  • Notes 172
  • 10 - Blue Cross: Health Insurance 175
  • Notes 190
  • 11 - AT&T's Grand Design for Dominance in the Global Information Age 195
  • Notes 224
  • 12 - Conclusion 227
  • Notes 254
  • Bibliography 257
  • Index 267
  • About the Author 273
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