The Art of Midlife: Courage and Creative Living for Women

By Linda N. Edelstein | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I want to acknowledge the generosity of others. Early publishing advice came from Rowena McDade, M.S.W. Suggestions on the proposal came from Kathleen Slomski, M.B.A., and actual editing was done by Lee Rodin, M.S.W., and Fred Shafer, M.A. Good friends and talented colleagues read and critiqued the manuscript in different stages. Gloria Gallo, Ph.D., read the chaotic early draft and gave me the encouragement I badly needed. Very helpful comments came from Ellen Dresner, L.S.W., Hedda Leonard, Anita Adams, M.B.A., and my literary agent, Loretta Weingel-Fidel. Lisa Stolley, M.A., gently edited a later draft of the manuscript. Maria Fay, Peg White, M.L.S., and Steve Schmidt, M.L.S., librarians extraordinare, helped with final drafts. Martha Cristensen worked on the index. Charlie Waehler, Ph.D., also living with a book, and Margit Kir-Stimon, Ph.D., provided warm support and advice at many intervals during this process. Mark Epstein, J.D., Eve Epstein, J.D., and the other members of my second family, Charna, David, and Daniel Epstein, were regularly treated to all my ups and downs and remained remarkably sympathetic throughout. At Greenwood, thanks to Nita Romer, Editor, and Karen D. Treat, Production Supervisor.

I belong to several creative communities. Much of my thinking was confirmed by the women attending the fourth Chicago Professional Women's Conference, "A Weekend's Worth of Creativity," organized by Nancy Newton and myself. The students in "Separation, Loss and Mourning," a course I have taught for years at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology, have always provided inspiration by their interest. The Sunday Writing Group, with Margit, Nancy, and Kathleen, remains a high point of every month.

Finally, I turned the manuscript over to Nancy Newton, Ph.D., who, having already discussed these ideas with me for years, was also pressed into service to edit my words, check my thinking, and smooth out my uneven writing voice, all of which she did with her usual grace. She even read the notes. My most personal sources for confidence and courage remain Jennifer and Keira, my daughters. Thank you. I am blessed to have all these people in my life.

My deep appreciation goes to all the women who allowed me to enter and record a period of their lives. Women I interviewed and all the women I have worked with in therapy made themselves vulnerable in order to continue to go forward. It is always an honor to be invited into someone's life. I am endlessly heartened and amazed at the honesty of women who willingly open their lives because of concern and connection with other women they will never meet.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Art of Midlife: Courage and Creative Living for Women
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 215

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.