The Art of Midlife: Courage and Creative Living for Women

By Linda N. Edelstein | Go to book overview

NOTES

Quote in chapter title is from Joyce Carol Oates, ( 1975), Wonders of the invisible world (poem), in The fabulous beasts ( Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press), p. 7.

1
Linda Edelstein, ( 1995), Creative change as a result of midlife mourning (paper presented at the 103rd Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association, New York, New York).
2
Janet Surrey, ( 1985), Self-in-relation: A theory of women's development, Work in Progress, No. 13. (Wellesley, MA: Stone Center Working Paper Series). The Stone Center at Wellesley College in Massachusetts has produced some of the best ideas about self-in-relation theory as a way to conceptualize the development of women.
3
Nancy Chodorow, ( 1989), Feminism and psychoanalytic theory (New Haven: Yale University Press); Carol Gilligan, ( 1982), In a different voice ( Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press).
4
Bella Abzug with Mim Kelber, ( 1984), Gender gap ( Boston: Houghton Mifflin), pp. 117-31.
5
Gilligan, Different voice.
6
Daniel Stern, ( 1985), The interpersonal world of the infant ( New York: Basic Books). Using clinical experiments and observations, Daniel Stern has disproved one of Margaret Mahler's tenets that there is an undifferentiated bond between mother and infant, positing instead that infants have a core self from birth or before. Her 1968 book On human symbiosis and the vicissitudes of individuation ( New York: International Universities Press) is important to this discussion because in it she describes the subphases of healthy child development, during which the infant begins to learn that she is a distinct person from her mother, that as mothers leave and return, children can also leave and return.
7
Ibid.
8
David Trosman, ( 1993), Differentiation through re-internalization: An exploration of internalized objects and the curative process in psychotherapy (Psy.D. diss., Chicago School of Professional Psychology).
9
Joan Riviere, ( 1955), The unconscious phantasy of an inner world reflected in examples from literature, in M. Klein, P. Heinmann, and R. E. Money-Kyrle (Eds.), New directions in psychoanalysis ( New York: Basic Books), pp. 358-59.
10
Judith Jordan and Janet Surrey, ( 1986), The self-in-relation: Empathy and the mother-daughter relationship, in T. Bernay and D. Cantor (Eds.), The psycholgy of today's woman ( New York: The Analytic Press), pp. 89-91.
11
National Public Radio interview, Chicago, August 19, 1992.
12
Phyllis Greenacre, ( 1957), The childhood of the artist, Psychoanalytic Study of the Child 12:47-72 ( New York: International Universities Press).
13
Chodorow, Feminism, p. 102. Nancy Chodorow ( 1989) describes differentiation, or separation-individuation, as

coming to perceive a demarcation between the self and the object world, coming to perceive the subject/self as distinct, or separate from, the object/other. An essential early task of infantile development, it involves the development of ego boundaries (a sense of personal psychological division from the rest of the world), and of a body ego (a sense of the permanence of one's

-89-

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