Sandinista Communism and Rural Nicaragua

By Janusz Bugajski | Go to book overview

3
Sandinista Policies: The Peasantry

Agriculture is the key sector in Nicaragua's economy. Today, as in 1979, about 60 to 70 percent of Nicaragua's nearly 3 million people obtain the bulk of their resources directly from the land.1 Roughly half of them are peasants or campesinos -- direct agrarian producers cultivating parcels of land that they own or rent.

On the eve of the Sandinista takeover, the remaining 30 to 40 percent of Nicaragua's rural population included large and medium-sized "capitalist" landowners, seasonal farm workers, and full-time plantation wage laborers. A large proportion of the peasant proprietors also engaged in temporary or seasonal forms of wage labor to supplement their subsistence incomes.

Before 1979, Nicaragua's agricultural economy was dominated neither by foreign corporations nor by large quasi-feudal haciendas. During the previous 30 years the latter had been gradually displaced by capitalist agro-export farming on latifundios, or large estates. By 1978, the "rural bourgeoisie" accounted for about 9 percent of the rural population; it owned 84.8 percent of the nation's farmland and focused on agro-exporting. The bourgeoisie included large owners with holdings in excess of 350 acres and small and medium-sized owners with farms ranging in size

-35-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sandinista Communism and Rural Nicaragua
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page Iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword Vii
  • About the Author ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Summary xiii
  • Introduction: A Brief Overview Of Marxism-Leninism 1
  • 1 - Sandinismo: History and Ideology 11
  • 2 - Sandinismo: the Levers of Control 23
  • 3 - Sandinista Policies: the Peasantry 35
  • 4 - Sandinista Policies: Indigenous Peoples 63
  • 5 - Sandinistas and Contras The Contras 88
  • Conclusions 102
  • Postscript 108
  • Notes 111
  • Index 128
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 132

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.