Public Opinion

By Carroll J. Glynn; Susan Herbst et al. | Go to book overview
quickly. This is not to say that the availability of technology always determines how we see the political and social world, but it is the case that we are attracted to techniques that enable us to understand the world in what seems an efficient manner.

As students of public opinion and political processes, we must live with ambiguity when it comes to defining public opinion. The fact that we cannot define the term with precision does not mean that the field has no boundaries, as we will see in subsequent chapters. The sorts of intellectual debates, political phenomena, and theories that are described in this book will give you a firm understanding of what the field of public opinion is about--what is included under the general heading of "public opinion studies" and what is not.


Notes
1.
See Benjamin I. Page and Jason Tannenbaum, "Populistic Deliberation: The Zoe Baird Uprising," paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, 1995, Chicago.
2.
Gustave Le Bon, The Crowd: A Study of the Popular Mind ( London: Unwin, 1948), pp. 27-38.
3.
William Trotter, Instincts of the Herd in Peace and War ( London: Oxford University Press, 1919).
4.
Vincent Price, Public Opinion ( Newbury Park, CA: Sage Publications, 1992).
6.
Nelson N. Foote and Clyde W. Hart, "Public Opinion and Collective Behavior," in Muzafir Sherif and Milbourne O. Wilson, eds., Group Relations at the Crossroads ( New York: Harper and Bros., 1953), pp. 308-331.
7.
Herbert Blumer, Collective Behavior ( New York: Barnes and Noble, 1946).
8.
Price, Public Opinion.
9.
Blumer, Collective Behavior.
11.
Price, Public Opinion, p. 26; quotes from Robert E. Park, The Crowd and the Public and Other Essays ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1904), p. 80.
12.
Blumer, Collective Behavior, p. 189.
13.
Elisabeth Noelle-Neumann, The Spiral of Silence. Public Opinion--Our Social Skin ( Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984).
14.
Ronald Steele, Walter Lippmann and the American Century ( New York: Vintage, 1980).
15.
Walter Lippmann, The Phantom Public ( New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1925).
16.
Pierre Bourdieu, "Public Opinion Does Not Exist," in Armand Mattelart and Seth Siegelaub, eds., Communication and Class Struggle ( New York: International General, 1979), pp. 124-130.
17.
Michael Corbett, American Public Opinion Trends ( New York: Longman, 1991), p. 24.

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