Methods of Correlation and Regression Analysis, Linear and Curvilinear

By Mordecai Ezekiel; Karl A. Fox | Go to book overview

Preface to Third Edition

Thirty years have elapsed since the original edition of this book was written--years of political tensions and upheaval and of enormous progress in technical development. This last has been reflected in changes in some of the examples cited--from an automobile with two-wheel brakes in the 1920's to the orbit of an earth satellite in the late 1950's, and from methods for using hand calculators and card tabulators to those for electronic computers. Despite this technical progress, the basic elements of correlation analysis continue unchanged. The major emphasis, however, has shifted from correlation to regression, and the wide range of uses of the method in varied fields has led to many specialized applications or modifications. This is especially true in econometrics. Here the long controversy over mutually intercorrelated variables has finally produced an effective simultaneous- equation method for dealing with situations where single-equation solutions are inadequate; but apparently such situations are relatively infrequent.

In this third edition the senior author has been fortunate in securing the collaboration of an associate who has made distinguished contributions in these newer aspects of the field, particularly in their application to problems of actual research. The new chapter on simultaneous- equation solutions, Chapter 24, is one of his contributions. He is also responsible for the extended treatment of the analysis of variance in relation to regression problems (Chapter 23), the modernization of the chapter on standard errors in multiple regression (Chapter 17), and a complete revision of the treatment of error formulas for time

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