Methods of Correlation and Regression Analysis, Linear and Curvilinear

By Mordecai Ezekiel; Karl A. Fox | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 22
Measuring the way a dependent variable changes with changes in a qualitative independent variable

It is sometimes necessary to determine the change in one variable associated with changes in a qualitative independent factor; i.e., one which varies in ways that cannot be measured quantitatively. Thus if one is studying the effect of various factors affecting the values of individual farms, one might wish to include the kind of road on which the farm was located. Yet different kinds of roads, such as arterial highway, all-weather, gravel, or dirt, cannot be stated in the same way that the measurements for continuously variable factors can.

Measuring Simple Correlation with a Qualitative Variable. Where a single qualitative factor is to be considered as an independent variable, and a quantitative factor as the dependent, the regression relation may be determined by grouping the observations according to the category of the qualitative factor, and calculating the average value of the dependent factor for each group.

The intensity of correlation between the quantitative dependent factor and a qualitative independent factor is measured by the correlation ratio, which corresponds to the correlation coefficient or index in that it measures the proportion of the variation in the dependent factor explained by its association with the independent factor. Using n0 to represent the number of cases in each successive group according to the independent factor, and M0 to represent the mean of the dependent variable Y in each such group, the correlation ratio ηyx is defined

-378-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Methods of Correlation and Regression Analysis, Linear and Curvilinear
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 550

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.