Henry Ford and the Jews: The Mass Production of Hate

By Neil Baldwin | Go to book overview

CHAPTER NINE
The Jewish Question

To answer feeds the vehemence of the attacks. Not to answer
seems unmanly, and gives the enemies a chance to say our
silence acknowledges our guilt
.

RABBI HENRY PEREIRA MENDES,
Sephardic spiritual leader of Congregation Shearith Israel
in New York City, to Louis Marshall, president of the
American Jewish Committee 1

BY THE summer of 1920 the Jewish community in America was faced with a complicated dilemma: how to counter Henry Ford's considerable efforts to spread his antisemitic views without adding fuel to his fire—and how to coax both "uptown" and "downtown" Jewish leaders into making a concerted stand. Three men, Jacob Schiff, Cyrus Adler, and Louis Marshall, joined forces in a triumvirate of yahudim elite and challenged the Flivver King's efforts. 2

The leading representative light was Jacob Schiff (1847-1920), head of the banking firm of Kuhn, Loeb and Company. 3 Ironically, it was Schiff and his bank that, alongside the Warburgs (subsequently related by marriage), became the "symbol par excellence" of malevolent Jewish financiers in the pages of the Dearborn Independent. 4 The son of a dealer in shawls who became a stockbroker, Schiff was born in Frankfurt-am-Main. From childhood, he knew

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Henry Ford and the Jews: The Mass Production of Hate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Chapter One - Mcguffeyland *
  • Chapter Two - The Great Questions *
  • Chapter Three - Tin Lizzie *
  • Chapter Four - The Christian Century *
  • Chapter Five - Working Man's Friend *
  • Chapter Six - I Know Who Caused the War *
  • Chapter Seven - The Bolshevik Menace *
  • Chapter Eight - Exit Mr. Pipp *
  • Chapter Nine - The Jewish Question *
  • Chapter Ten - Retaliation *
  • Chapter Eleven - The Talmud-Jew *
  • Chapter Twelve - Heinrich Ford *
  • Chapter Thirteen - Sapiro v. Ford *
  • Chapter Fourteen - Apology *
  • Chapter Fifteen - Apostle of Amity *
  • Chapter Sixteen - The Chosen People *
  • Chapter Seventeen - I Am Not a Jew Hater *
  • Chapter Eighteen - Hitler's Medal *
  • Chapter Nineteen - The Radio Priest *
  • Chapter Twenty - Transitions *
  • Afterword *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Bibliography *
  • Notes *
  • Permissions *
  • Index *
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