Mosby's Complementary Alternative Medicine: A Research-Based Approach

By Lyn W. Freeman; G. Frank Lawlis | Go to book overview

9
Imagery

Lyn W. Freeman


HY READ THIS CHAPTER?

Imagery is the foundation of mind-body medicine. It is the essential and activating element in the clinical use of relaxation therapy, meditation, biofeedback, and hypnosis. Imogery, in the forms of placebo and event-interpretation. also affects quality of life and health outcomes every day.

The effective incorporation of imagery into any intervention requires that the clinician have a thorough understanding of the way the body functions in relation to the health condition being addressed. He or she must also understand the types of imagery used in interventions, how these varying types affect the body biochemically and hormonally, and how to facilitate imagery sessions that are biologically accurate yet represent the individual's personal expressiveness. The effects of imagery are subtle but powerful. This chapter gives the health professional an overview of what must be considered in the effective use of imagery as intervention.


CHAPTER AT A GLANCE

Imagery is the thought process that invokes and uses the senses. These include vision, sound, smell, and taste, and the senses of movement, position, and touch. Virtually nothing exists in our experience that we do not image in some way, and those images con produce physiologic, biochemical, and immunologic changes in the body that affect health outcomes.

Most typically, when imagery procedures ore used for clinical or experimental purposes, they fall into one of three categories : diagnostic imagery, mental rehearsal imagery, and end-state imagery. These forms and their combined clinical uses are described in this chapter.

imagery has been found beneficial in the treatment of eczema, acne, diabetes, breast cancer, arthritis, migraine and tension headaches, and severe burns. imagery has also been used as treatment to improve lactation in mothers of premature infants, to increase coping skills with birth pain, and as intervention with anticipatory grief.

Research strongly suggests that imagery is capable of altering specific immune parameters, hormonal responses, and immune cell migration. Further, imagery assessment tools have been used to assess treatment for cancer, spinal pain, and diabetes and have been proven highly accurate as predictors of treatment outcomes. Imogery is the foundation of mind-body medicine. It is a powerful tool that, when used effectively, can assist in healing the mind, body, and spirit.

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Mosby's Complementary Alternative Medicine: A Research-Based Approach
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 532

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.