Political Mobilization: A Sociological Analysis of Methods and Concepts

By J. P. Nettl | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO

Political Culture-Level

SUMMARY

A discussion of political culture in the framework of any systems analysis must do justice both to the problem of measuring quantity, and also attempt to find a means of comparing quality. Though in many senses quality is the first-order problem, convenience dictates a discussion of quantity first. An attempt will be made to find concepts for the criteria of measurement; in what way can culture be defined for purposes of quantitative measurement? The criterion chosen is, simply stated, knowledge and evaluation of problems of government, with particular reference to the orientation towards institutionalized authority. Some examples will be given of the types of problems involved. Next, and closely connected with this, is the relationship between political culture and the notion of participation. Almond and Verba in the Civic Culture have relied mainly on participation as a means of classifying political cultures; a brief critique of this approach is undertaken. At the same time the problem of ideology and consciousness in the context of political culture must be raised here. Next it will be necessary to search for indices in order to measure varying levels of culture and some possible alternatives are examined. An important distinction between 'hard' indices of acculturation, and 'soft' indices related to orientations is emphasized. Finally, the notion of a continuum of levels of political culture is broken down into five different thresholds, according to which individual societies, and sectors of society, can be classified and compared.

Without a discussion of quality there cannot really be any discussion of quantity or extent of culture, otherwise we do not really know what we are measuring. 1 However, there are good reasons for beginning here with a discussion of quantity. For one thing, a dis

____________________
1
See e.g. Colin Cherry, On Human Communications, New York 1957, pp. 256-73. Cf. Deutsch, Nerves of Government, pp. 87-88.

-56-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Mobilization: A Sociological Analysis of Methods and Concepts
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 442

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.