Exceptional Fossil Preservation: A Unique View on the Evolution of Marine Life

By David J. Bottjer; Walter Etter et al. | Go to book overview

7
Beecher's Trilobite Bed:
Ordovician Pyritization
for the Other Half of the Trilobite
Walter Etter

THE ORDOVICIAN UTICA AND LORRAINE FORMATIONS OF New York State are composed of shales, siltstones, and limestones that have yielded a considerable amount of remarkable fossils, including large articulated eurypterids. Parts of these formations might be considered as Lagerstätten by themselves, but it is a very thin layer within the Frankfort Shales of the Utica Formation that has attracted much attention and has become world famous: the so-called Beecher's Trilobite Bed. This layer has become especially well known for the preservation of pyritized trilobites, which show not only perfectly articulated exoskeletons, but preservation of soft parts, including legs and antennae, muscles, and parts of the digestive tract. Sedimentological evidence indicates that Beecher's Trilobite Bed formed as a consequence of a sudden influx of sediment, carrying bottom-dwelling animals for some distance before burying them under a cover of fine siltstone. Beecher's Trilobite Bed is thus a classic example of an obrution deposit.

The first trilobites with preserved appendages were discovered in 1884 by the amateur collector William S. Valiant in loose blocks along Six Mile Creek near Rome, in upstate New York (Whiteley 1998, 2000). It was not until 1892, however, that he was able to locate the trilobite bed in outcrop. This exciting discovery, first published in 1893 (Matthew 1893), quickly drew the attention of Charles Emerson Beecher, a paleontologist at Yale University. Beecher started excavating the locality in 1893, but by 1895 the trilobite bed was thought to be mined out, and quarrying ceased (Briggs and Edgecombe 1992, 1993). Beecher's sampling efforts yielded

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Exceptional Fossil Preservation: A Unique View on the Evolution of Marine Life
Table of contents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 403

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.