On Mood Swings: The Psychobiology of Elation and Depression

By Susanne P. Schad-Somers | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The fact that this manuscript got done on time is only due to the fact that Pamela White Hadas gently but very firmly coerced the author—a dyslexic and a confirmed technophobe—to jump headlong into the twentieth century by getting a computer. Furthermore, and that is the sign of true friendship, she retyped and edited countless manuscript pages which were lost to that voracious electronic beast. Similarly, Jean Mundy, time and again, dropped whatever she was doing, jumped into her car and bailed me out of assorted mechanical jams. She too read and retyped several sections of this book. I am immensely grateful to both of them.

As for Peter from Spread the Word Computer Services in Sag Harbor: Consider it done.

Morris Stein—again—extended himself beyond the call of duty, even friendship, by not only reading and critiquing four exceedingly unkempt chapters, but doing so in the space of a weekend and then leaving five single-spaced pages of comments on my front porch.

I am grateful to Stanley Schachter for roasting me over the coals as unmercifully as he did. As a result I now have a most extensive collection of modifiers, one that undoubtedly (or for the most part, perhaps) will be large enough to last me for the rest of my life.

Regina Cherry, with an unerring nose for split infinitives and missing commas, read each and every page with great care,

-xi-

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On Mood Swings: The Psychobiology of Elation and Depression
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Contents xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Jack the Wrong Kind of Help 17
  • Chapter Two - Portraits 23
  • Chapter Three - History 65
  • Chapter Four - Psyche 85
  • Chapter Five - The Biology of Cell Communication 99
  • Chapter Six - Psychobiology 125
  • Chapter Seven - The Acquisition of Mood Regulation in the Human Infant 148
  • Chapter Eight - How Psychotherapy Heals 178
  • Chapter Nine - Special Problems 209
  • Chapter Ten - Case Material 231
  • Postscript Behavioral Medicine 253
  • References 259
  • Index 275
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