The Young Scientists: America's Future and the Winning of the Westinghouse

By Joseph Berger | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Chapter Seventeen
Lessons

To a science teacher in Averagetown, U.S.A., the odds of harvesting a Westinghouse scholar or two must seem daunting indeed. The teacher must compete for the precious plaques with counterparts at Bronx Science and at the growing number of state-operated, dormitory-equipped science high schools. All these schools, the teacher reckons, probably have state-of-the-art laboratories, computers that rival the acrobatics of the human brain, trained researchers, access to teaching hospitals and universities. What is the point of competing?

There are nuggets of truth among these anxieties, but they are vastly exaggerated. As we have seen, Bronx Science, Stuyvesant, and Midwood do not have state-of-the-art laboratories, just clever, well-thought-out research programs. Their teachers are for the most part pedagogical lifers and not refugees from cutting‐ edge research institutions. The access the schools have to research institutions is a result of relationships they have artfully cultivated over the years, as well as simple geographic proximity. Moreover, lots of students who do not attend schools like Bronx Science capture laurels. Young people like Christopher Skinner manage to put it all together though they hail from what a Bronx Science sophisticate might consider a hayseed town.

The moral in all this is that thoughtful planning, willpower, and tenacity are far more important than equipment in the pursuit of the Westinghouse or, more important, the scientific acumen such programs breed. True, there are few cities, let alone suburban and rural communities, that can sustain special science schools, that have the money to finance them and populations large enough to grow a schoolful of science-minded students. But virtually all of the

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Young Scientists: America's Future and the Winning of the Westinghouse
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 243

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?