Yellow Fever, Black Goddess: The Coevolution of People and Plagues

By Christopher Wills | Go to book overview
GLOSSARY
Anopheles mosquitoes Mosquitoes of this genus are the chief insect vectors of the human malarias.
Antibody A protein produced by our immune system that can bind to one or more foreign proteins or other molecules. This binding usually sets in train a number of processes that can destroy the foreign invaders.
Antigen A protein or other molecule that can stimulate the production of antibodies.
Bases The order in which the four types of bases (called in biological shorthand A, T, G and C) are arranged along the DNA molecule encodes its genetic information.
Bejel A yaws-like disease, transmitted primarily by body contact, widespread until recently in North Africa and the Middle East.
Black Death The most famous of the many outbreaks of bubonic plague. It peaked in Europe in I348. It did not receive its dread modem name until 1823, being called by many other names before that time.
Buboes The swollen lymph nodes, particularly in the groin and armpits, characteristic of bubonic plague victims.
Bubonic plague Caused by the bacillus Yersinia pestis. The bubonic form is spread by rat fleas, while the more contagious pneumonic form is spread through the air.
CD4 A molecule found on the surface of helper T-cells and a few other cells in the body. It normally binds to MHC molecules on

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