Disjointed Pluralism: Institutional Innovation and the Development of the U.S. Congress

By Eric Schickler | Go to book overview

References

Abram, Michael, and Joseph Cooper. 1968. “The Rise of Seniority in the House of Representatives.” Polity 1: 52–85.

Aldrich, John H. 1994. “Rational Choice and the Study of American Politics.” n C. Lawrence Dodd and Calvin Jillson, eds., Dynamics of American Politics. Boulder, Colo.: Westview Press.

Aldrich, John H. 1995. Why Parties? The Origin and Transformation of Party Politics in America. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Aldrich, John H., and David W. Rohde. 1995. “Theories of the Party in the Legislature and the Transition to Republican Rule in the House.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago.

Aldrich, John H. 1996. “A Tale of Two Speakers: A Comparison of Policy-Making in the 100th and 104th Congresses.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, San Francisco.

Aldrich, John H. 1998. “Measuring Conditional Party Government.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Chicago.

Aldrich, John H. 1999. “The Consequences of Party Organization in the House: Theory and Evidence on Conditional Party Government.” Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Atlanta.

Aldrich, John H., and Kenneth Shepsle. 1997. “Explaining Institutional Change: Soaking, Poking, and Modeling in the U.S. Congress.” Paper presented at a conference in honor of Richard Fenno, University of Rochester, October 24– 25, 1997.

Alexander, Albert. 1955. “The President and the Investigator: Roosevelt and Dies.” Antioch Review 55: 106–17.

Alexander, De Alva. 1916. History and Procedure of the House of Representatives. Boston: Houghton Mifflin.

Allen, Robert S., and Drew Pearson. 1931. Washington Merry-Go-Round. New York: Horace Liveright.

Alsop, Joseph, and Robert Kintner. 1941. “Never Leave Them Angry.” Saturday Evening Post, January 18, 1941, 21.

Anderson, Sydney. 1921. “The Latest Thing in Blocs.” Country Gentlemen, December 31, 1921, 3, 21.

Arnold, Douglas R. 1990. The Logic of Congressional Action. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Arrow, Kenneth J. 1951. Social Choice and Individual Values. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Atkinson, Charles R. 1911. The Committee on Rules and the Overthrow of Speaker Cannon. New York: Columbia University Press.

Bach, Stanley. 1990. “Suspension of the Rules, the Order of Business, and the Development of Congressional Procedure.” Legislative Studies Quarterly 15: 49–63.

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