Female and Male Voices in Early Modern England: An Anthology of Renaissance Writing

By Betty S. Travitsky; Anne Lake Prescott | Go to book overview

21
Anne Edgcumbe Dowriche (before 1560–after 1613)
Christopher Marlowe (1564–1593)

Anne Edgcumbe Dowriche Interprets History

Anne Dowriche (before 1560–after 1613), daughter of Sir Richard Edgcumbe of Mount Edgcumbe, Cornwall, married Hugh Dowriche, a rector, and bore at least three children. Her strongly Protestant French History (1589) is a long poem, in poulter's measure (hexameters alternate with fourteeners), with three parts: “The outrage called the winning of St. James his street, 1557,” “The constant martyrdom of Annas Buggaius, one of the king's council, 1559,” and “The bloody marriage of Margaret, sister to Charles IX, Anno 1572.” Dowriche bases her story on Thomas Timme's translation of Jean de Serres's Commentaries (1574) and FranÉois Hotman's De furoribus gallicis (printed in London in both Latin and English, 1573; Marlowe, too, used Hotman's text for his Massacre at Paris). Her prefaces confess to her brother, Pearse Edgcumbe, and to the reader that weaknesses in her work show “that it is merely a woman's doing”; but she hopes “to restore again some credit if I can unto poetry”: for there is not “in this form anything extant which is more forceable to procure comfort to the afflicted, strength to the weak, courage to the faint hearted, and patience unto them that are persecuted, than this little work, if it be diligently read and well considered.” We give portions of Part 3 from the 1589 edition, including its marginal glosses in our notes.

-260-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Female and Male Voices in Early Modern England: An Anthology of Renaissance Writing
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 411

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.