Killing Monsters: Why Children Need Fantasy, Super Heroes, and Make-Believe Violence

By Gerard Jones | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I've been astonished and gratified at the eagerness of so many people within the educational, medical, psychological, entertainment, and parental communities to help me make this book a reality. Each one of those experiences has reminded me of how people of the most diverse and divided opinions can be brought together by passion for children, concern for the future, and the simple joy of trying to understand how people work—and each one has reminded me of how a little empathy and honesty can knock down the greatest rhetorical and emotional barriers.

Among those who gave their time to increase my understanding were Dr. Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi of the Claremont Universities, Dr. William Damon of Stanford University, Dr. Lenore Terr of the University of California—San Francisco, Dr. Ralph DiClementi of Emory University, Dr. Donald F. Roberts of Stanford University, Dr. Stuart Fischoff of California State University—Los Angeles, Dr. Jib Fowles of the University of Houston, Dr. Edwin H. Cook of the University of Chicago, Dr. Donna Mitroff of ABC Family, Dr. Helen Smith of ViolentKids.com, Dr. Roben Torosyan of New School University, and Dr. Rachel Lauer, the late chief psychologist of the New York City Schools.

Dr. Lynn Ponton of the University of California, Dr. Carla Seal‐ Wanner of NewYork University and Dr. Nancy Marks were exceptionally generous in reading and critiquing chapters, as well as in sharing insights from their work and family lives. Dr. Melanie Moore gave me much help in the book's earliest stages. I'm also very grateful to the many clinical psychologists who shared with me their hard

-viii-

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Killing Monsters: Why Children Need Fantasy, Super Heroes, and Make-Believe Violence
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Foreword vi
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • 1 - Being Strong 1
  • 2 - Seeing What We're Prepared to See 23
  • 3 - The Magic Wand 45
  • 4 - The Good Fight 65
  • 5 - Girl Power 77
  • 6 - Calming the Storm 97
  • 7 - Fantasy and Reality 113
  • 8 - The Courage to Change 129
  • 9 - Vampire Slayers 149
  • 10 - Shooters 165
  • 11 - Model, Mirror, and Mentor 183
  • 12 - Not So Alone 205
  • 13 - Growing Up 219
  • Notes 233
  • Index 251
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