Voices and Echoes for the Environment: Public Interest Representation in the 1990s and Beyond

By Ronald G. Shaiko | Go to book overview

NOTES

Preface
1
V.O.Key Jr., The Responsible Electorate: Rationality and Presidential Voting, 1936–1960 (New York: Vintage Books, 1966), p. 2.

1. Voices and Echoes in the Public Interest Marketplace: The Development of the
Public Interest Sector
1
Ralph Nader's first target of consumer activism was the American automobile industry and, in particular, the manufacturers of the now extinct Corvair. He presented his case in Unsafe at Any Speed: The Designed-In Dangers of the American Automobile (New York: Grossman, 1965).
2
For contemporary conceptualizations of political activism, see Sidney Verba, Kay Lehman Schlozman, and Henry E. Brady, Voice and Equality: Civic Voluntarism in American Politics (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1995); Steven J. Rosenstone and John Mark Hansen, Mobilization, Participation, and Democracy in America (New York: Macmillan, 1993); and Robert H. Salisbury et al., “Triangles, Networks, and Hollow Cores: The Complex Geometry of Washington Interest Representation,” in Mark P. Petracca, ed., The Politics of Interests: Interest Groups Transformed, pp. 130–149 (Boulder: Westview Press, 1992).
3
Development directors and direct mail list brokers interviewed by the author present this general profile based on their analysis of membership attributes and opinions.
4
Quoted in Ronald G. Shaiko, “Greenpeace U.S.A.: Something Old, New, Borrowed,” The Annals 528 (Summer 1993): 93.
5
Ralph Nader, “Foreword,”in Foundation for Public Affairs, Public Interest Profiles, 1992–1993, p. xi, opening quotation found on pp. xv–xvi (Washington, D.C.: Congressional Quarterly Press, 1992).
6
David Cohen, “The 1990s and the Public Interest Movement,” in Leslie Swift-Rosenzweig, ed., Public Interest Profiles, 1988–1989, p. xv (Washington, D.C.:

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Voices and Echoes for the Environment: Public Interest Representation in the 1990s and Beyond
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.