American Alchemy: The California Gold Rush and Middle-Class Culture

By Brian Roberts | Go to book overview

Notes

ABBREVIATIONS

INTRODUCTION
1
Herman Melville, Billy Budd, Sailor & Other Stories (New York: Penguin Books/Viking Press, 1967), 57–99
2
On Bartleby as a symbol for fears of isolation, see Michael T. Gilmore, American Romanticism and the Marketplace (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1985), 133–39.
3
James A. Read, Journey to the Gold Diggins, by Jeremiah Saddlebags, illustrated by J. A. and D. F. Read (New York: Stringer & Townsend, 1849).
4
H. L. Mencken, The Vintage Mencken (New York: Vintage, 1955), 76, 92. See, for example, C. Wright Mills, White Collar: The American Middle Classes (New York: Oxford University Press, 1951); Walter E. Houghton, The Victorian Frame of Mind, 1830–1870 (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1957), 54–89; John F. Kasson, Rudeness and Civility: Manners in Nineteenth-Century Urban America (New York: Hill and Wang, 1990); Norbert Elias, The History of Manners: Volumes I–II (New York: Pantheon, 1978 [1939]); C. Dallett Hemphill, “Middle Class Rising, 1750–1820: The Evidence from Manners” Paper delivered at the meeting of the Organization of American Historians, April, 1995; Daniel T. Rogers, The Work Ethic in Industrial America (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1978), 18–19; Richard Bushman, The Refinement of America: Persons, Houses, Cities (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1992); and Stuart M. Blumin, “The

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American Alchemy: The California Gold Rush and Middle-Class Culture
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • American Alchemy *
  • Introduction 1
  • One - California Gold and Filthy Lucre 17
  • Two - Gold Fever as a Cure 43
  • Three - Husbands and Wives 69
  • Four - Numberless Highways to Fairy Grottos 93
  • Five - A Great and Perverse Paradise 119
  • Six - California Is a Humbug 143
  • Seven - Widows and Helpmates 169
  • Eight - A Wild, Free, Disorderly, Grotesque Society 197
  • Nine - The Prude Fails 221
  • Ten - The End of the Flush Times 243
  • Conclusion 269
  • Notes 277
  • Index 321
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