Defining Public Administration: Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration

By Jay M. Shafritz | Go to book overview

19
PUBLIC MANAGEMENT

Mary E. Guy

Florida State University

The application of the craft, art, and science of management to a context where political values govern the evaluation of success and where the rule of law dictates constraints on administrative discretion. Because political preferences bring policy shifts, the ability to navigate in politicized waters is a skill that is as essential to the public manager as the ability to plan, organize, staff, direct, budget, and perform other standard managerial duties. Public management means "doing" government. And, because politics is a key dimension to government, public management requires mastery of political as well as administrative skills.

Public managers work in city, county, state, and federal government, as well as special districts. They work in executive, judicial, and legislative agencies in roles as varied as the missions of those agencies. For example, missions range from wastewater treatment plants to foster care for children ; from highway engineers to agricultural extension agents; from welfare services to weather forecasting; from public health services to law enforcement; from public education to firefighting; from national defense to economic development; from environmental protection to emergency preparedness; from tax collection to neighborhood zoning; from parks and recreation facilities to court administration; from public libraries to highway safety; from national research and development laboratories to regulatory commissions. Managing each of these enterprises requires substantive knowledge of the policy arena pertaining to the mission, mastery of generic managerial skills, a keen ability to maximize political

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Defining Public Administration: Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Board *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface vii
  • Part One - Overviews of Public Administration *
  • 1 - Public Administration 3
  • 2 - American Administrative Tradition 17
  • 3 - Feminist Theory of Public Administration 30
  • Part Two - Policy Making *
  • 4 - Policy 39
  • 5 - Policy Leadership 43
  • 6 - Policy N Etwork 65
  • 7 - Rule 73
  • Part Three - Intergovernmental Relations *
  • 8 - Intergovernmental Relations 83
  • 9 - Mandates 102
  • 10 - Government Corporation 110
  • Part Four - Bureaucracy *
  • 11 - Bureaucracy *
  • 12 - Bureaucrat Bashing 128
  • 13 - Bureaupathology 132
  • Part Five - Organization Behavior *
  • 14 - Organizational Culture 137
  • 15 - Groupthink 147
  • 16 - Mies's Law 151
  • 17 - Parkinson's Law 154
  • 18 - Peter Principle 156
  • Part Six - Public Management *
  • 19 - Public Management 161
  • 20 - Scientific Management 169
  • 21 - Management Science 180
  • 22 - Entrepreneurial Public Administration 184
  • Part Seven - Strategic Management *
  • 23 - Leadership 191
  • 24 - Strategic Planning 208
  • 25 - Mission Statement 230
  • Part Eight - Performance Management *
  • 26 - Productivity 237
  • 27 - Reengineering 249
  • 28 - Quality Circles 271
  • 29 - Public Enterprise 279
  • Part Nine - Human Resources Management *
  • 30 - Public Personnel Administration 295
  • 31 - Mentoring 307
  • 32 - Pay-For-Performance 315
  • 33 - Workforce Diversity 322
  • 34 - Glass Ceiling 339
  • Part Ten - Financial Management *
  • 35 - Financial Administration 345
  • 36 - Congressional Budget Process 355
  • 37 - Target-Based Budgeting 367
  • Part Eleven - Auditing and Accountability *
  • 38 - Audit 375
  • 39 - Accountability 382
  • 40 - Stewardship 396
  • Part Twelve - Ethics *
  • 41 - Administrative Morality 407
  • 42 - Standards of Conduct 416
  • 43 - Regime Values 420
  • 44 - Lying with Statistics 422
  • 45 - Whistleblower 428
  • Appendix - A Complete List of the Articles in the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration 437
  • Index 447
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