Defining Public Administration: Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration

By Jay M. Shafritz | Go to book overview

27
REENGINEERING

Albert C. Hyde

The Brookings Institution

A management approach to change for organizations that revisualizes and redesigns an organization's core work processes to achieve dramatic improvements in organizational performance by significantly decreasing operating and support costs, improving production and service cycle time frames, and increasing customer satisfaction with the product and the service quality and value.

Reengineering, perhaps better termed Business Process Reengineering (BPR), has become the 1990s change management method of choice. Although definitions abound, there is a general understanding that reengineering involves revisualizing and redesigning an organization's core work processes to accomplish very dramatic and rapid improvements. Such redesigns focus primarily on (1) lowering operating and support costs, (2) improving service delivery time and response levels, (3) increasing product and service quality levels, and (4) enhancing employee involvement in reaching organizational goals.

Reengineering as a change strategy assumes that organizations must have lower costs, faster service, more innovative products, and are beyond trading off one facet against the other. Most organizations have used various forms of cutback management to reorganize or realign resources to handle increased workloads or to speed up service response times by reassigning staff or adding more personnel. But to cut costs by increasing levels of productivity by 50 percent, speed up product completion or service delivery (what is referred to as "cycle time") by 75 percent to 100 percent, or create entirely new service features or products for

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Defining Public Administration: Selections from the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Editorial Board *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface vii
  • Part One - Overviews of Public Administration *
  • 1 - Public Administration 3
  • 2 - American Administrative Tradition 17
  • 3 - Feminist Theory of Public Administration 30
  • Part Two - Policy Making *
  • 4 - Policy 39
  • 5 - Policy Leadership 43
  • 6 - Policy N Etwork 65
  • 7 - Rule 73
  • Part Three - Intergovernmental Relations *
  • 8 - Intergovernmental Relations 83
  • 9 - Mandates 102
  • 10 - Government Corporation 110
  • Part Four - Bureaucracy *
  • 11 - Bureaucracy *
  • 12 - Bureaucrat Bashing 128
  • 13 - Bureaupathology 132
  • Part Five - Organization Behavior *
  • 14 - Organizational Culture 137
  • 15 - Groupthink 147
  • 16 - Mies's Law 151
  • 17 - Parkinson's Law 154
  • 18 - Peter Principle 156
  • Part Six - Public Management *
  • 19 - Public Management 161
  • 20 - Scientific Management 169
  • 21 - Management Science 180
  • 22 - Entrepreneurial Public Administration 184
  • Part Seven - Strategic Management *
  • 23 - Leadership 191
  • 24 - Strategic Planning 208
  • 25 - Mission Statement 230
  • Part Eight - Performance Management *
  • 26 - Productivity 237
  • 27 - Reengineering 249
  • 28 - Quality Circles 271
  • 29 - Public Enterprise 279
  • Part Nine - Human Resources Management *
  • 30 - Public Personnel Administration 295
  • 31 - Mentoring 307
  • 32 - Pay-For-Performance 315
  • 33 - Workforce Diversity 322
  • 34 - Glass Ceiling 339
  • Part Ten - Financial Management *
  • 35 - Financial Administration 345
  • 36 - Congressional Budget Process 355
  • 37 - Target-Based Budgeting 367
  • Part Eleven - Auditing and Accountability *
  • 38 - Audit 375
  • 39 - Accountability 382
  • 40 - Stewardship 396
  • Part Twelve - Ethics *
  • 41 - Administrative Morality 407
  • 42 - Standards of Conduct 416
  • 43 - Regime Values 420
  • 44 - Lying with Statistics 422
  • 45 - Whistleblower 428
  • Appendix - A Complete List of the Articles in the International Encyclopedia of Public Policy and Administration 437
  • Index 447
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